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J2EE vs .NET in the healthcare industry (I need career advice!)

 
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There are infinitely more experienced and "real world" people here than I. I would enjoy hearing a discussion on the place of J2EE within the healthcare industry in comparison to .NET

This is for guidance and career related decisions. I have used both technologies and, as of now, continue using both of them. But I would like to -master- (or at least become well rounded!) one of these.

Anyone with experience in the healthcare industry is welcome to comment. I'd really appreciate to hear some words from the battlefront

For me a concern is: with the restricted IT budgets in healthcare, can they afford a J2EE application server in addition to a product license you sell them?

Edit: I understand the responses here might be a little bias but I am looking for an objective viewpoint. I think these are two great technologies but for this particular task I need to know which is the best
[ December 20, 2004: Message edited by: Steve Buck ]
 
Steve Buck
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More specifically when I say healthcare industry I mean hospitals and services managed for satellites by regional offices. Think in terms of deploying something (say a medical records system) to each of these hospitals/regional offices.

The cost of an application server seems prohibitive at first but then again I've heard of "express" and middle business targetted application server versions.
[ December 20, 2004: Message edited by: Steve Buck ]
 
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Originally posted by Steve Buck:
There are infinitely more experienced and "real world" people here than I. I would enjoy hearing a discussion on the place of J2EE within the healthcare industry in comparison to .NET

This is for guidance and career related decisions. I have used both technologies and, as of now, continue using both of them. But I would like to -master- (or at least become well rounded!) one of these.

Anyone with experience in the healthcare industry is welcome to comment. I'd really appreciate to hear some words from the battlefront

For me a concern is: with the restricted IT budgets in healthcare, can they afford a J2EE application server in addition to a product license you sell them?

Edit: I understand the responses here might be a little bias but I am looking for an objective viewpoint. I think these are two great technologies but for this particular task I need to know which is the best

[ December 20, 2004: Message edited by: Steve Buck ]



A friend of mine works for a hospital, they use Apache, Tomcat, Struts and Hibernate. Their J2EE costs are very low, since they don't need EJB.
 
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and even if they did, they cud use JBoss, and very soon Geronimo.

Originally posted by peter wooster:


A friend of mine works for a hospital, they use Apache, Tomcat, Struts and Hibernate. Their J2EE costs are very low, since they don't need EJB.

 
Steve Buck
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Thanks for the feedback, peter wooster.

Unfortunately I will be needing EJB for what I want to accomplish if I go the J2EE route :/
 
soniya saxena
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Nope...why unfortunate???
As i said earlier, JBoss & very soon Geronimo.

Originally posted by Steve Buck:
Thanks for the feedback, peter wooster.

Unfortunately I will be needing EJB for what I want to accomplish if I go the J2EE route :/

 
peter wooster
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Originally posted by soniya saxena:
Nope...why unfortunate???
As i said earlier, JBoss & very soon Geronimo.


I agree, where I work some projects have an enormous budget for this sort of thing and use Oracle9IAS. The project I'm currently working on has no budget for anything like that so we are using Tomcat and maybe JBoss if we need it. One thing to be very careful about is checking that you really have a need for EJB, if not, you may be better off with something like Hibernate.
 
Steve Buck
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I'll need to use JMS and MDB with queues to communicate between multiple physical sites (hospitals) according to a recommendation by another user in another thread. I tried to find something equivalent to a windows service and timers but was told to use this design.

I guess that means I'm stuck with EJB support requirement?

(I'm afraid that I'm not overly familiar with J2EE--my knowledge is limited to a little scratch JSP, servlets, session and entity beans.)
 
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I know some people developing a product for the health care market. Their second client needed deployment on a Mac OS X server, so .NET was definitely not an option.
 
soniya saxena
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I think Spring had JMS support in its roadmap, I am not sure if they have implemented it yet. If yes, then u dont need MDBs.

Originally posted by Steve Buck:
I'll need to use JMS and MDB with queues to communicate between multiple physical sites (hospitals) according to a recommendation by another user in another thread. I tried to find something equivalent to a windows service and timers but was told to use this design.

I guess that means I'm stuck with EJB support requirement?

(I'm afraid that I'm not overly familiar with J2EE--my knowledge is limited to a little scratch JSP, servlets, session and entity beans.)

 
Steve Buck
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Originally posted by Warren Dew:
I know some people developing a product for the health care market. Their second client needed deployment on a Mac OS X server, so .NET was definitely not an option.



That is one of the reasons I've considered J2EE for learning. I would really hate to isolate a portion of potential users when I develop things (I'm not saying I'll be able to sell, but hypothetically).

I will also need rich, cross platform clients too. I -may- be able to get away with using a web client though (so that is why ASP .NET is acceptable).

Arg too many decisions :/
 
Steve Buck
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Originally posted by soniya saxena:
I think Spring had JMS support in its roadmap, I am not sure if they have implemented it yet. If yes, then u dont need MDBs.



Would you have any pointers (or advice on what to google) for that? I'm not familiar with any of the J2EE design (patterns?) or how JMS can replace MDBs in this case.

Foremost the system will need to communicate with other systems on a regular interval basis (say, every 60 mins one site pushes content to all its peers and vice versa... no pulling/requesting allowed).
 
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SUN app server 7.x and 8.x PE can be used for FREE even for production

it is even cheaper than JBOSS, because you have to spend 100$ for JBOSS documentation

SUN app servers are J2EE 1.3 and 1.4 compatible, so for example MQ SW is also included


and rest of commercial versions of SUN's servers are based on PE edition, so you get same quality as SUN's customers
 
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