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what is the need?

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 2
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If .NET is doing just what J2ee can, then why would anybody want them to be interoperable. IMHO only when a new project is started, then there is a need to make a choice between j2ee and .net
 
Ranch Hand
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You can think in this way.
Company A has used MS servers for a long time. It has developed or bought many applications on MS platforms.
Another company, Company B, starts its business for 5 years. It used non-MS application servers, like IBM or HP. Applications are worked on Unix C, or Java.
As business grows, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) becomes one of the popular ways for exchanging data between 2 parties. Since the 2 companies using different languages to implement the applications, they cannot talk directly. In the past, we may use COBRA, however, we must also use IIOP as the protocol, which is not too common nowadays.
Since Internet grows, more and more people use Internet, and HTTP as the protocol. Thus, if, applications can talk with using HTTP, it will be good. In addition, since XML is data oriented, if the 2 applications understand XML, no matter what language they used, they can understand the DATA. Here comes the Web Services.
Since what we want to exchange is the data ONLY, thus, if A sends B the data, and B understands what data it is, and thus know how to process it, then send back the proceed data back to A, it will be good.
And in some sense, as Internet becomes more and more popular, people become more easy to get info from many sources, so do B2B.
Nick
 
Ranch Hand
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The company I'm working for has own-made applications in .NET and J2EE. Alright it is a very large company, 10.000 employees but still.
 
Greenhorn
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I feel that the need is really in the interest of reuse. Cost and time demands are always driving forces in our industry and if we have assets that are J2EE or .Net components, and need the same functionality in the opposite platform, then integrating the components MIGHT make sense to avoid development cost to port the component to the competing platform. Even if all development in a shop is done in one or the other technology this can become an issue with mergers and acquistions, expanding scopes of partnerships, and or integrating purchased software solutions.
Anything that you can have in your "bag of tricks" to produce quicker and cheaper results is of benefit is it not?
 
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