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Most in demand skills in the market

 
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I have been away from coding in the past 1-2 years. I am wondering what are the most in demand skills in the job market? Are spring and struct still popular? Any help is appreciated.
 
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The most demanded job skills that I see are...

  • high IQ
  • leadership
  • teamwork (both within engineer and external to it)
  • communication skills written and oral
  • ability to learn quickly
  • ability to see the big picture


  • The best news is these skills are likely to continue to stay in demand for years to come despite technology paradigm shifts.

    --Mark
     
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    Well said Mark !
    There are people who have shifted from other projects (Mainframes , Testing etc) to my project (SAP implementation) and have done really well within a very short period of time .
     
    clojure forum advocate
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    But leadership isn't required for every position, right?
    Leadership is required for managers, architects, senior developers but not for rookie developers
     
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    Oddly enough, in India, a major demand is "number of years of work-ex".

    I'm not saying that isn't important at all. But far too much emphasis is laid on it then it deserves.

    But then Indian companies recruit in such (large) numbers that this criteria is the most efficient filter for them.
     
    Mark Herschberg
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    Originally posted by John Todd:
    But leadership isn't required for every position, right?
    Leadership is required for managers, architects, senior developers but not for rookie developers



    (Coincidentally this is one of the topics I was just teaching at MIT last week; I'll give you the same message I gave them.)

    Leadership is required of everyone. A mistake is to think that leadership comes from a role, e.g. CEO, project manager, architect, VP. Leadership comes from the actions your take; a leader is someone who influences others and get them to follow in a vision/path/direction. Even the most junior rookie can put forth an idea and convince others of it. Ultimately, if you can't contribute in this way, if you simply wait for others to put forth ideas and do what they say, your value to the team will be limited. Leadership isn't simply about national movements and politics, it's about being compelling sitting around the meeting room and that's something everyone must do.

    Even if you fee you are just out of school and lack experience to contribute in that way for 6-12 months, you should still work on your leadership skills. What makes a good leader? Someone who is credible, passionate, capable, trustworthy, determined, focused, listens to others and incorporates their feedback, etc. What makes a good collaborate (i.e. one who follows a leader)? Someone who is credible, passionate, capable, trustworthy, determined, focused, listens to others and incorporates their feedback, etc. Working on those skills when following the leadership of others will help you develop the skills for when you become a leader.

    Personally, I only hire people capable of being leaders, at any level. Any good leader knows you don't lead all the time, but someone who only follows and can't lead, simply won't add much value to my department.

    --Mark
     
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    In terms of technology --- SOA.
     
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    Back to the original question, somewhat...

    Are spring and struct still popular? Any help is appreciated.



    Not a valid statistical sampling, but... I still see Spring used in projects. I haven't seen a Struts project in more than a year.

    Henry
     
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    In my opinion, people with average IQ and who are able to sustain drive, commitment, passion and engagement are more likely to succeed than people with High IQ but lack drive, passion and commitment.

    New Technologies and frameworks come and go, but if you build the following skills you can easily adapt to changes easily:

  • Ability to look at the big picture and drill down to relevant level of details as and when required.
  • A good understanding of the fundamentals & key areas relating to Java/J2EE software design & development.
  • Ability to look at things not only from a technical perspective but also from a business/stakeholder perspective & good interpersonal skills.


  • [ January 22, 2008: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
     
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