• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Ron McLeod
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • paul wheaton
  • Tim Cooke
  • Henry Wong
Saloon Keepers:
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
  • Frits Walraven
  • Piet Souris
Bartenders:
  • Mike London

Finish the Cattle Drive before taking the SCJP?

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 458
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My current opinion is that, due to my green-ness in Java, I should finish the Cattle Drive before seriously preparing for the SCJP exam.
I would like to hear the opinions and experiences of others on this matter.
Thank you
 
Trailboss
Posts: 23615
IntelliJ IDE Firefox Browser Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I see no reason not to do both.
Preparation for the exam will beat the Java language into your head. The Cattle drive will give you more real world experience and an understanding of how to apply what you have learned.
 
Desperado
Posts: 3226
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
"MY STORY"
You should, IMO, buy two or three good books on Java... The "problem" is choosing which ones
There are so many, most of them (I bet), bad.
Then you have to consider your background as in level of programming experience, does it include OOP (like C++) or not (like me).
Eight months ago almost to the day, I posted my first question about Java to the USENET newsgroup comp.lang.java.programmer. Before that I did not know OOP. Only C and assembly (and FORTRAN from a previous life!)
After becoming 100% bored in my last position as a C (and "off-line") programmer, I decided to change things.
I decided to learn the language and did not think about certification until later, as an afterthought when I figured it would be somewhat unreasonable to expect a decent job programming in Java with just my word backing up the claim. (Well I have some programs on the Web which I'll use as an example of what I have done, but still...)
As such, I covered much more material from what's included in the exam. I learned applets, networking, more AWT that's covered in the test, reflection...
I used the Core Java books, the (Sun) Java Tutorial 2nd ed. and Java Tutorial Continued (both paper), Bruce Eckel's Thinking in Java, Ivor Horton's Beginning Java, Just Java 2 (Linden), Java I/O (Harold), Java Threads (Oaks and Wong), Exploring Java (Niemeyer and Peck), The Java Programming Language (Arnold and Gosling)
I have many more but I haven't gotten to them yet: The new editions of Graphic Java 2 (two vols, AWT and Swing), the Java Swing book published by O'Reilly.
Last but not least, The Java Class Libraries, 2nd ed (3 volumes, 10 lbs?) are an invaluable reference!
 
Ray Marsh
Ranch Hand
Posts: 458
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks guys.
I recently bought "Just Java 2" and I lifted ( just once or twice ) the "The Complete Java 2 Certification Guide" and will soon purchase that as well. And also I plan to buy the Refactoring book that Paul suggested.
The book review page is very helpful as well.
Finding the time to read books and write code is the real challenge, the Java part is easy! ( yeah right )
 
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic