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practical reasons to move to Java 1.5?

 
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OK, another question. I work on a large product that has evolved over the last five years, and has lived through the release of Java 1.3 and 1.4. We specify a required level of Java, but the decision to adopt a new major level of Java has very little to do with new language features - unless new language features offer significant advantages when implementing a new feature (or, exceptionally, reasons to reimplement an old one) they will not be considered a reason for us to change. The main reason to upgrade is if some useful package is being brought into J2SE SDK (JNDI in the case of v1.3, JSSE/JAAS/JCE in the case of v1.4), which makes things easier from a service point of view.

If relevant features weren't introduced then we wouldn't move until the existing Java level went out of service (i.e. if it wasn't for JSSE we would still pre-req Java 1.3.1, which seems to still be supported by Sun). Once we have moved to a new major level of Java, we will start to use new language features in areas of new development (old code is unchanged unless it uses newly-deprecated methods; why risk breaking something that works?).

In the current climate, new development projects are uncommon - the vast majority of Java development will be focussed on existing projects - do you think that Java 1.5 introduces any new features (apart from the headline language changes) that would be a reason to upgrade from Java 1.4? Do you think Java 1.5 uptake is likely to be widespread?
 
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Originally posted by Ben Ritchie:
In the current climate, new development projects are uncommon - the vast majority of Java development will be focussed on existing projects - do you think that Java 1.5 introduces any new features (apart from the headline language changes) that would be a reason to upgrade from Java 1.4? Do you think Java 1.5 uptake is likely to be widespread?



If there is no new development projects, there is very less likely that the team will adopt the Tiger... I don't think an existing project should upgrade its JDK version to 1.5 just only because of the new features provided by the Tiger...

If it's running and working properly, we don't even need to touch them, except doing some performance tuning....

Of course, IMO, Tiger will boom in th industry like .Net once boomed... So be prepare to see the greatest success story of Tiger...
 
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Ben,

I agree with ko ko that there is no need to updgrade existing code to java Tiger.

Herb's book is a great one to start learning Java Tiger.
 
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I agree that the adoption to 5.0 will be slow. I think many of the features were in response to Microsofts C# language features. Java needs to look more at productivity like Microsoft does and less at "Academic" issues.

Just my 2 cents

Sal
 
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I agree with you. Java 1.4 satisfied my need.
 
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The use of Tiger will eventally become the market's majority, however, we may need to wait for 1-2 years.

MS's platform and programming language may not be that easy to take over Java's market, due to the platform issues, as there is no C# for AIX machine.

They focus on different areas.

Nick
 
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Without changing your code, it might be useful to recompile 1.4code and ship with a new JRE, to gain the performance improvements.

Especially startup-time improved, which is of course only intersting for client-jvm.
 
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:
MS's platform and programming language may not be that easy to take over Java's market, due to the platform issues, as there is no C# for AIX machine.



You are right, Nick... I'm currently writing some Java Utility Applications on AIX machine in my work also... Java is a must for that, except that some basic things can be done by using Unix Shell Scripting Language...
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