• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Ron McLeod
  • Paul Clapham
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • paul wheaton
  • Rob Spoor
  • Devaka Cooray
Saloon Keepers:
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
  • Frits Walraven
  • Tim Moores
Bartenders:
  • Mikalai Zaikin

inner question

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 178
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,
Inner class question:
Q.1 Given:
public class MyClass {
public class MyRunnable implements Runnable
{
public static void main(String [] args)
{
(new Thread(new MyRunner())).start();
}
}
How to rectify it? change it to (new Thread(new MyClass().new MyRunner())).start(); ??
Thanks
Andrew
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 3244
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Andrew
A couple of points.
What is the actual question you're asking?
You can't have a static method in a non-static inner class, so you'll have to move your main method to the enclosing class.
To create an instance of the inner class you need to an instacne of the enclosing class first.
This code should do what you'r elooking for:

hope that helps

------------------
Dave
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java� 2 Platform
 
Andrew Parker
Ranch Hand
Posts: 178
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry,
I missed the void run() method and they should be separated.
Here is what I ask:
public class MyClass
{
public static void main(String [] args)
{
//MyClass.MyRunnable mr = new MyClass().new MyRunnable();
//new Thread(mr).start();
(new Thread(new MyClass().new MyRunnable())).start(); //I want to know whether they are the same.
}
public class MyRunnable implements Runnable
{
public void run(){}
}
}
Thanks for your kind help.

Andrew
 
Dave Vick
Ranch Hand
Posts: 3244
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Andrew
Yes both ways you have shown will accomplish the same thing - they both create and start a MyRunnable object. The major difference is that in the first way you'll actually have a reference to a MyRunnable object that you can refer to later in your code. The second way you wont.
hope that helps
------------------
Dave
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java� 2 Platform
 
Andrew Parker
Ranch Hand
Posts: 178
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks a lot, Dave.
I got it.
Regards
Andrew
 
Men call me Jim. Women look past me to this tiny ad:
a bit of art, as a gift, that will fit in a stocking
https://gardener-gift.com
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic