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Best way to learn Java!

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 25
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I'm writing this, because I tried to learn and really understand the concepts of Java for quite some time. I started as most of the folks here probably did, I downloaded some web tutorials, I visited a couple of web resources, then I decided to go for some good books. Although there are really great books out there and most of them merely worked as references, I never really had the feeling to understand all the concepts in-depth.
This has changes dramatically when I had finished a book called "Head First Java".
For the first time (since years) I now have the feeling to really understand all the key concepts and I managed to deep-dive into Java programming without the need to memorize all those API methods, etc.
I hope this is not off-topic, but if anybody wonders how to start learning Java I recommend the following:
1. Buy and read "Head First Java". It's a very uncommon book. It's not one of those "just another nutshell book about Java" type of book. Read it. It might take you 5-10 days.
2. Having finished reading "Head First Java", go for one of the usual references, maybe one from O'Reilly. Having read "Head First" you will find it exceptionally easy to run through standard Java books.
3. Start programming.
I hope this is not too off-topic, but I got really surprised by what I have been able to learn and understand for the first time even after heaving read so many Java references and guides. So I thought this might be of any help for other "newbies".
Regards
Ralf
 
Sheriff
Posts: 7023
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This is definitely a good place to share a good tip on learning Java for beginners.
Thanks for sharing your experience, Ralf. Hope to see more of you 'round the Ranch!
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 123
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I'm enjoying the Head First Java book, too, Ralph. Right now I'm in the Interfaces section, and honestly am getting bored with it. I'm really wanting to write graphically-based stuff, such as that TankWars game I've been wanting to write for months. Knowing how short my attention span is, if I can just hang on for another 100 pages, I'll get into GUI-based stuff I am wondering why the Listener interfaces weren't talked about much in the book, as I feel that the mouse and keyboard are the interaction orginates in games. Maybe it's all just hidden in the book
 
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