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phillips bits that don't strip

 
Trailboss
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I seem to remember having a phillips bit once that I really liked. It had little gripper ridges that would go in the phillips screw head. It seemed to strip the scew less. But I can't seem to find these any more. Is it my imagination?
 
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I don't remember any such bits, but wish I did.
I'm in the middle of a kitchen remodel which includes taking down the cabinet doors (sanding and refinishing each one, drawers too). The hardware has been up for over twenty years and is attached with soft brass screws, that, to add insult, were shellacked over. The screws that don't strip, when attempting removal, have a nasty habit of breaking off in the hole making replacement a, errr, challenge.
What I would give for a "magic bit" that would ease the pain of screw removal!
 
lowercase baba
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Last time i bought lumber for an outdoor project, the Lowe's (or Home Depot) has screws there with a "special" head. The box came with a special bit for my screwgun. it was like a phillips, but closer to a + shape - i.e. like the Red Cross' cross, rather than an 'X'. this isn't exactly what your asking - it require special screws AND a special bit. i've not seen a bit that will 'dig in' to a regular phillips screw.
Bear,
a few years ago, Bob Villa was pimping something from Sears that was supposed to be able to remove ANY screw, no matter how stripped it was. I don't remember exactly what they called it, or if it even worked, but it might be worth checking out (although it won't address the broken shaft issue...)
 
author
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look at http://www.aldn.com/xout.html
Eric
 
paul wheaton
Trailboss
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Craftsman is probably what I am thinking of.
About 15 years ago I remember all the hype about the craftsman name, so I bought craftsman. When I bought phillips bits, I rememeber that they were far more expensive than the other brands, but I thought "That's because they're craftsman. When they wear out, you bring them back and they replace it for free." But when they wore out and I brought them back, they would not give me new ones. So why did they charge so much more? Because I'm a stupid sucker.
So I avoid Sears. Not they have ever noticed my protest.
 
Ranch Hand
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Could it have been a Posidrive bit? These are apparently quite similar to Phillips but not quite the same.
Recently I was doing some work on my wife's car and had to get a set of Torx bits. Similar to Allen keys but more of a star configuration. These feel wonderfully positive. They can be immensely tight but still unscrew easily without any slipping. I can see why so many car manufacturers use these now. I remember how cheated I felt the first time I stripped an Allen bolt.
Ken
 
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Originally posted by KR Campbell:

Recently I was doing some work on my wife's car and had to get a set of Torx bits. Similar to Allen keys but more of a star configuration.


Still have the foot-long, T-shaped Torx wrench you needed to open up one of the original Macs (128, 512, Plus, SE). A Torx wrench, a spreader, and a ground strap. Take you half an hour and a couple hundred bucks to put in a 1 meg RAM upgrade. Ah, those were the days.
 
Ranch Hand
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If you live in Blighty axminster do the same sort of thing.
 
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Paul, as KR is alluding to. - It sounds like you are using a phillips bit with a posidrive screw?
 
paul wheaton
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The screw looks like a regular phillips head. How do you tell the difference?
For the most part, it works fine. But when my 12 year old son tries, he doesn't line the drill up quite right and things start to strip.
 
SJ Adnams
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i did try to find pictures, but this is all i could come up with..
http://www.hafeleonline.com/canada/support/faq.html#BB
..so if you have a posidrive screw, the hole will have a blunt bottom. so when you use a phillips driver (which is sharp) it will not seat all the way down and so you will get slippage.
Not sure what the most common is in the USA? In the UK pretty much all steel woodscrews are posidrive, more ornamental (e.g. brass) screws tend to be phillips.
a cross + is phillips.
a star * is posidrive.
 
KR Campbell
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:

Still have the foot-long, T-shaped Torx wrench you needed to open up one of the original Macs (128, 512, Plus, SE). A Torx wrench, a spreader, and a ground strap. Take you half an hour and a couple hundred bucks to put in a 1 meg RAM upgrade. Ah, those were the days.


Indeed! In a fit of overzealous tidying a few years ago I took my Mac SE to the rubbish dump, soft carrying case and all. I regret it now even though the hard drive sounded like a 747 taking off. Remember when the original Macs *were* laptops. We thought they were portable!
 
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