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Cavendish & Harvey

 
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Just about the best boiled sweets ever. They keep pretty well in the car for long journeys and those times when stuck in traffic.

Favourite flavours - Mango && Kiwi drops
Butterscotch

Also have Rhubarb drops, Coffee Drops, Sour Cherry, Pear && Blackberry and I bet they are all just as nice
 
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"boiled sweets (UK)" == "hard candy(US)" ?
 
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
"boiled sweets (UK)" == "hard candy(US)" ?



Yup, thats about it summed up.

Boiled Sweets seem to be something that belonged to my Grandparents generation; Ive never went out into the shops to buy them, but I always remember my Gran having a bag of "Soor Plooms" when Id go to visit.

That and cracking my teeth on them as well
 
Helen Thomas
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Yes,they also have Sour Lemon, and Lemon and Lime drops.
There's a light dusting of icing sugar so that they don't stick to each other and this brand really tastes like real fruit.
The Butterscotch isn't like butterscotch by which I mean toffee, but just buttery enough without locking your jaws together tight. ( How else would you eat butterscotch ?) Butterscotch toffee icing, perhaps.
They come in little round tins like my grandfather used to keep his tobacco in.The tin has Made in U.S.A for Cavendish & Harvey Ltd. London WC2 England.
Printed in China.
 
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Originally posted by Helen Thomas:
Yes,they also have Sour Lemon, and Lemon and Lime drops.
There's a light dusting of icing sugar so that they don't stick to each other and this brand really tastes like real fruit.
The Butterscotch isn't like butterscotch by which I mean toffee, but just buttery enough without locking your jaws together tight. ( How else would you eat butterscotch ?) Butterscotch toffee icing, perhaps.
They come in little round tins like my grandfather used to keep his tobacco in.The tin has Made in U.S.A for Cavendish & Harvey Ltd. London WC2 England.
Printed in China.




I think butterscotch and toffee are two different things in the US.
I like butterscotch, I'm not quite sure what toffee tastes like.
 
Helen Thomas
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Toffee is caramelised sugar to which is added some butter enough to make the consistency soft and malleable. Generally toffee in Britain is quite soft like marzipan(almond paste with a higher ratio of sugar to ground almonds);
in some parts of the world it may be brittle. The latter is usually called butterscotch. Hope I am right on the last point.
 
Ernest Friedman-Hill
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I would say here in the US the whole range of soft-to-brittle candies you're describing would be called toffee, whilst "butterscotch" is always used to mean a flavor. It's never used a noun: "here have some butterscotch" sounds odd to my ear, it's always "here have some butterscotch candy/syrup/ice cream/cake/whatever."

OK, now, so what is this American "butterscotch" flavor, then? Well, honestly, I'm not sure. It's clearly also redolent of burnt sugar and butter, although precisely how it differs from toffee I can't say.
 
Helen Thomas
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I've found out that real butterscotch is a Scottish treat made from dark brown sugar (demarara) and butter. And it's hard not brittle.

Anyone tried Pontefract cakes ? Or Kendal Mint cakes ?They are sweets - not cakes.
The latter are particularly good on long Arctic expeditions. Or so they tell you if you climb the mountains around the Lake District. It was eaten at th e end of the expedition to Mount Everest 1953.
[ June 25, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
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