• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Ron McLeod
  • Tim Cooke
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
Sheriffs:
  • Paul Clapham
  • Rob Spoor
  • Junilu Lacar
Saloon Keepers:
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Piet Souris
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:

[etymology]: Labukh

 
Leverager of our synergies
Posts: 10065
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
(The last sound is like "h" in "inheritance").

This is a Russian word which means "musician, a member of a musical band". I wonder what language it is borrowed from. I was told that the main suspects are Yiddish/Hebrew, Romanian and Turkish. But most likely it's Yiddish or Hebrew, if to believe this excerpt:

"When you play a wedding in Russia, you don�t want the customer to understand what you�re saying. So labukh or labushnik is a musician, lomir labern means "let�s play," bashalemen means to pay up, and a lazhuk is someone who�s a pain in the butt. My partner Mishka used to say, "Every simkhe, every celebration, has to have a lazhuk, someone who bothers you, who tells you that the music is too loud or too this or too that." That�s a lazhuk."
http://clevelandjewishradio.tripod.com/bezyler.html
 
whippersnapper
Posts: 1843
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
(The last sound is like "h" in "inheritance").

Come into some money lately, Map?

("Inheritance" just seems like such an unlikely word to me for demonstrating the "h" sound.)

Years ago I had a colleague at work who used to pick the most bizarre words to spell out other words with. (She sometimes made travel arrangements for visiting foreigners, so it wasn't unusual to hear her spelling out people's names over the phone.)

If she had to spell out the word "inheritance" it would probably be something like

"i" as in "industrialized"
"n" as in "nepotism"
"h" as in "hamstring"
"e" as in "epiphany"
"r" as in "radius"
"i" as in "instrument"
"t" as in "telephony"
"a" as in "assimilation"
"n" as in "neanderthal"
"c" as in "cemetery"
"e" as in "engaged"

Used to crack me up. When I asked her about it once, she said that each new letter put her on the spot and made her feel panicky and she'd just blurt out the first word that came to mind.
 
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Posts: 10065
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
MM: "Inheritance" just seems like such an unlikely word to me for demonstrating the "h" sound.

It is still closer than "K", with which it could be most likely confused, considering the spelling. Any idea why this kind of sound (I am not sure it's always the same sound) is spelled as "kh" (khan, khalif etc.) in English?

Ok, how about "ch" in "Loch Ness"?
[ September 28, 2004: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My personal favorite is "p" as in "pterodactyl" (or "psychology" or "pneumonia")
 
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Posts: 10065
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is an opinion that the word came from the Gipsy language. Link for MM (text in Russian).
 
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic