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Calculating a satisfying bite

 
Ranch Hand
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Take a Twinkie which I think is the most common snack on the Ranch.The Twinkie is merely a Golden Sponge Cake with Creamy Filling. What's the ratio of number of bites to Twinkie heaven ? Given 10 Twinkies to choose from which one would you select and why - more goo or less? Which drink base is best to do this test?

For others : There are about three bites in a Marks and Spencers Chocolate Yule Log. That's a mini chocolate cake log coated in dark chocolate. Dunked first into an Asda Arabica Roast Coffee made with skimmed milk is three bites to Mocha heaven.
[ December 13, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
pie sneak
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Deep fry the Twinkie. The ratio varies depending on the strength of your heart.
 
Helen Thomas
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Deep fried Mars Bars are supposed to be good. Fortunately for me it sounds revolting.
 
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Ah! I'd always wondered what a Twinkie was. While we're on the subject of strange American foods, just what is an English muffin? How is it different from non-English muffins? We have muffins in England, but they're not English or non-English... just muffins.
 
Helen Thomas
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An English muffin is like a flattened soda bread , any flatter and it would be a pitta.

What's commonly known as a muffin is the cake muffin, blueberry , cinnamon, carrot cake muffins etc. (American in origin).
 
Helen Thomas
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Twinkie after a gravitational response test to check how suitable it would be in space as food for astronauts.
 
lowercase baba
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from here



English Muffins:

The story is that an English baker, a certain Samuel B. Thomas, started making these flat chewy things in America over 100 years ago, from his mother's tea cake recipe. The English deny that they ever heard or saw anything like it until they were imported from America. Today you can find Thomas' English Muffins in most English supermarkets. Imported from America.

The curious thing is that 'muffins' in the U.S. are not anything like these so-called 'English Muffins'. (Maybe this was an inexperienced English immigrant baker's attempt to make crumpets* from a half remembered recipe of his mother's.) Muffins in America are 'quick breads' that is, made with no yeast, but leavened with egg and baking powder.

´┐ŻEnglish Muffins´┐Ż are about 3 inches round and 1 inch high, yeast raised (basically a bread dough) and baked on a griddle. To get the proper texture when split in two they should not be cut with a knife, but should be split with a fork. The resulting rough texture gives them a certain crunchiness when toasted (and helps them hold gobs of butter and preserves).


[ December 14, 2004: Message edited by: fred rosenberger ]
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