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French/German/Japanese???

 
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Hi all,

I am thinking to join a foreign language class. Which language will be beneficial for career. I have equal interest in these three: French, German, Japanese.

Thanks.
 
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Definitely Japanese, you will be unique in the crowd
 
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Learn German.
1)Europes highest spoken language.
2)Spoken in 4 nations.Germany,Austria,Switzerland and Lichenstein.
Lichenstein is very very small nation between Austria and Switzerland.
3)Combined GDP of these 4 nations is twice the GDP of UK.
[ September 28, 2005: Message edited by: Bhiku Mhatre ]
 
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Hello Rathi

Are you going to some other country ?
 
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If you are in India, then I believe that it is easy to find coaching for French and German language.
 
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[Du-du Du-du Du-du duuuu Du-du Du-du Du da doodie do...]

Which three countries gave us the most trouble during World War II?
 
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Originally posted by John Dunn:
[Du-du Du-du Du-du duuuu Du-du Du-du Du da doodie do...]

Which three countries gave us the most trouble during World War II?



 
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Originally posted by rathi ji:
Hi all,

I am thinking to join a foreign language class. Which language will be beneficial for career. I have equal interest in these three: French, German, Japanese.

Thanks.



If you like french fries, frenchies, french cut beard, french toast
then learn French
 
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From job prospective "Japanese" or German would be good choice else its all depends on your personal interest.
 
Chetan Parekh
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Just find out babes from which country are cool and learn the language of that country.
 
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Konnichi Wa - (hello)
I was learning Japanese language and discontinued learning.
Here are few things I learnt about Japanese.
1) Japanese are real hard workers. So if you are working in Japan, make sure you get accustomed to their way of working.(working hard)
2) For Japanese, if you say you know something, you either know if fully or dont know it. It is either 0 or 1. There is "NO" inbetween stage.For ex:If you say you know Java/J2ee, you cant say I dont know RMI/EJB.
3) Japanese are very strict about deadlines. If you fail to adhere to dealines, be sure to have proper reasons for that.
One strange thing about them is the way they fix deadlines. Assume they start project X. The start of the project is 28/09/2005 and end is 30/12/2005. Assume they start collecting requirements from today. They have coding and testing phases.The strange point here is even though the requirements phase continue to extend the deadline remains the same. If they have fixed 15 days to collect requirements, 30 days for coding and 15 days for testing and for some reason the requirements phase/coding phase has extended to few more days, the deadline does not change.

Sayonara -(bye)
 
ankur rathi
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Originally posted by Pradip Bhat:
Hello Rathi

Are you going to some other country ?



No.. but it is always good to know these languages...
 
ankur rathi
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Originally posted by Chetan Parekh:
Just find out babes from which country are cool and learn the language of that country.



This may be another interesting thread from your side...

 
Chetan Parekh
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One of my co-worker is learning Gujarati language, just that there are some cool Gujju girls around his desk.
 
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Originally posted by Sripathi Krishnamurthy:

One strange thing about them is the way they fix deadlines. Assume they start project X. The start of the project is 28/09/2005 and end is 30/12/2005. Assume they start collecting requirements from today. They have coding and testing phases.The strange point here is even though the requirements phase continue to extend the deadline remains the same. If they have fixed 15 days to collect requirements, 30 days for coding and 15 days for testing and for some reason the requirements phase/coding phase has extended to few more days, the deadline does not change.



I think it's a vast overgeneralization to say that Japanese software projects are run in any particular way, any more than saying that projects in any other country are run one certain way. Japan has its share of ISO-9000 shops, and Agile shops, and waterfall shops, just like any other place.
 
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Originally posted by Chetan Parekh:
Just find out babes from which country are cool and learn the language of that country.


I recommend french from that perspective.

From a job perspective Germany is in a loooong kind of soft recession. Around 12% here are without jobs currently. We are the country with the falling real wages in the last 5 years or more. Currently our people are flooding swiss job market.

Also in higher skilled jobs most germans know to speak enough english.

You have to defintively stay in the country to really learn a language (except english, because english is everywhere).
I would see it first as a kind of hobby.

With your signature (lots of failed this, failed that) you might fit well into the current situation of Germany.
Every year we somehow manage to beat last years company insolvency records and every month news like that:
Daimler? announced that they will cut 1000 jobs. Siemens? 3.000 jobs shipped to eastern europe. IBM Germany? 1.500 cut etc. etc.

Might improve a bit, but last 3 years were all but encouraging for a lot of people here.
[ September 28, 2005: Message edited by: Axel Janssen ]
 
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Originally posted by Axel Janssen:

I recommend french from that perspective.

From a job perspective Germany is in a loooong kind of soft recession. Around 12% here are without jobs currently.



Germany is in a recession, but they will pull through. I would still loved to have been born a German any day. We are just having a lucky spell with our high consumer spending. Our is economy is synonymous to that of a finely tuned Scoda that somehow manages to out perform Germany�s badly tuned Mclaren. When they get tuned up they will rocket past us and will show the US a run for its money.
 
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Originally posted by Sripathi Krishnamurthy:
Japanese are very strict about deadlines. If you fail to adhere to dealines, be sure to have proper reasons for that.
One strange thing about them is the way they fix deadlines. Assume they start project X. The start of the project is 28/09/2005 and end is 30/12/2005. Assume they start collecting requirements from today. They have coding and testing phases.The strange point here is even though the requirements phase continue to extend the deadline remains the same. If they have fixed 15 days to collect requirements, 30 days for coding and 15 days for testing and for some reason the requirements phase/coding phase has extended to few more days, the deadline does not change.

Sayonara -(bye)


In 80% of the projects that I have worked on requirements have either got delayed or the requirements delivered on the deadline were not clear enough, so we have to spend time clarifying the requirements, and the deadline never change. Few times, I have had the deadline pulled forward because entire sections of the requirements were dropped off. I have never met a person from Japan in my life. Unfortunately, this problem is all too widespread in the software industry.
 
Axel Janssen
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Gerald,

This is all aggregated and be generalized for everything here.
Nevertheless I think in Europe currently the smaller countries like Austria, Netherlands, Finland, Ireland and even Belgium are somewhat closer to the smart economy we had for a long time in the 2nd half of the 20th century.
During the election campaign there were so much blunder and too much people believe it.
Things are improving in some areas. For example our schools are getting better again slowly, but it appears to be a steady process.
You might attribute some positive values to a group of 80 million people, but this can change quickly. England was an engineering leader during the 19th century and they definitivedly had lost that position in 1980. Germans were seen as daydreaming alcoholics in 18th century. Norway was the poorest country of Europe at the beginning of the 20th century and now they are richest.
There were an Economist article about our comeback. The most important argument of that article was that the wages has fallen so much in comparision to neighbouring countries.
 
Sripathi Krishnamurthy
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:


I think it's a vast overgeneralization to say that Japanese software projects are run in any particular way, any more than saying that projects in any other country are run one certain way. Japan has its share of ISO-9000 shops, and Agile shops, and waterfall shops, just like any other place.



This is what I have heard or noticed about them. These are my personal views and not generalization.
 
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Dont know about other languages but Japanese is very tough to learn...if you are prepared to put in a hard effort then only got for it. And to qualify as a japanese language professional you must clear their language certification levels (There are 4 levels as far as I can recall) - and different companies have different requirements - so even a basic level might be enough for you.

Job wise also there is lot of money for such professinals both in India and in Japan.
 
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Rath ji,

A person conversant with Sanskrit can get an easy grasp of German language. There are subtle similarities there which aid in getting a firm grasp of the language sooner.

French can be complex, in the sense that what they write is so much different from the way it is spoken. Some of their pronunciations are quite nasal and if one doesn't practice them often (and properly!) one just cannot get it right no matter what. If you don't have direct access to audio tapes or really professional speakers then it doesn't help much direct your efforts properly.

There are no inputs I can provide as far as Japanese is concerned. I have a colleague here who learns Japanese but that is all there is to it. Both German and French are widely used but whether the same is true for Japanese I am not sure.
 
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Originally posted by Saket Barve:

A person conversant with Sanskrit can get an easy grasp of German language. There are subtle similarities there which aid in getting a firm grasp of the language sooner.



Similarly, a Tamil speaker should find Japanese relatively easy to learn � I speak Tamil (not my first language), and every time I watch a Kitano movie, I just can�t stop noticing the similarities!
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Rathi

What have you decided
 
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Originally posted by Ashok Mash:


Similarly, a Tamil speaker should find Japanese relatively easy to learn � I speak Tamil (not my first language), and every time I watch a Kitano movie, I just can�t stop noticing the similarities!



Really ?! that's interesting considering that Tamil movies ( read Rajnikanth movies ) are popular among Japanese ! Can you give an example ? While I agree with sanskrit(or even Hindi, in fact) and German parallel, I cannot imagine anything between Tamil and Japanese ( I speak Tamil and learnt Japanese enough to say Domo Arigatho ).
[ September 30, 2005: Message edited by: soumya ravindranath ]
 
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I learnt spoken Japanese (quite some time ago), and can tell there are quite some noticeable similarities.
One is the way the sentence (subject, object, verb) is structured.
Un - peyar - enna? (Your - name - is what?)
Anato no - namaye wa - nandeska?

And then there are syllables that are used to imply things.. (Edit-I just realized there are not implying possessive tense, but I don't know what they are called)

Tamil: Pen-a kodu (the 'a')
Japanese: Pen-o kodusai (the 'o')

Similarities and Differences
[ September 30, 2005: Message edited by: kayal cox ]
 
soumya ravindranath
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Originally posted by kayal cox:
I learnt spoken Japanese (quite some time ago), and can tell there are quite some noticeable similarities.
One is the way the sentence (subject, object, verb) is structured.
Un - peyar - enna? (Your - name - is what?)
Anato no - namaye wa - nandeska?

And then there are syllables that are used to imply things.. (Edit-I just realized there are not implying possessive tense, but I don't know what they are called)

Tamil: Pen-a kodu (the 'a')
Japanese: Pen-o kodusai (the 'o')

Similarities and Differences

[ September 30, 2005: Message edited by: kayal cox ]



It's the same in another South Indian language, Kannada! I guess I should watch some Japanese movies in original and figure out if Japanese is closer to Tamil or Kannada Would be an interesting project.
 
ankur rathi
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Originally posted by Pradip Bhat:
Rathi

What have you decided



Probably I will join French class. It is tough to find Japanese teacher...


 
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KC: I learnt spoken Japanese (quite some time ago), and can tell there are quite some noticeable similarities.

One is the way the sentence (subject, object, verb) is structured.


If you are interested in this topic, read Mark C. Baker's "The Atoms of Language" -- it's a fascinating book!
[ October 06, 2005: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
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Bonjour � tous! J'apprends le fran�ais. Je suis au niveau d�butante.

Go for French. It's a nice challenge for your brain
 
Sripathi Krishnamurthy
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I can get you Japanese teachers if you are in Bangalore.
 
Sameer Jamal
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Originally posted by soumya ravindranath:


It's the same in another South Indian language, Kannada! I guess I should watch some Japanese movies in original and figure out if Japanese is closer to Tamil or Kannada Would be an interesting project.




Interestingly Tamil movies are most watched movies in Japan outside South India.
 
ankur rathi
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Originally posted by Sripathi Krishnamurthy:
I can get you Japanese teachers if you are in Bangalore.



Thanks but I am in Pune.
 
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