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Agile Testing ----Is it useful for a Java EE developer?

 
Greenhorn
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Hello Lisa & Janet,

As a JavaEE developer, sometime involve in application design, is it useful to read this book?

Thanks in advance.
 
Rancher
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I have not read the book. But from experience, I can say that Agile processes and patterns are extremely useful in the J2EE world. The only issue is that you must attempt to adopt them as a team. It is really hard to start using agile or XP processes alone. You've really got to get buy-in from your whole team to it work really smoothly. But once you have that, development is faster, more fun, and more rewarding.
 
author
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Matthew Taylor wrote:I have not read the book. But from experience, I can say that Agile processes and patterns are extremely useful in the J2EE world. The only issue is that you must attempt to adopt them as a team. It is really hard to start using agile or XP processes alone. You've really got to get buy-in from your whole team to it work really smoothly.



On the other hand, it might be easier to get buy-in from your team, if you can demonstrate that you already had personal success with using the practices. So, sometimes it's valuable to just bite the bullet and start doing it for yourself, as far as possible.
 
Vincent Zhao
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Thank you so much, Matthew Taylor .
I will doing some research first.
 
Ranch Hand
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Vincent Zhao wrote:Hello Lisa & Janet,

As a JavaEE developer, sometime involve in application design, is it useful to read this book?

Thanks in advance.


Hi Vincent,
I work on a team of JavaEE developers, and I think they would say yes! As we recommend in the book, my entire team is engaged in testing activities, and committed to delivering the highest quality software. We all work together with the customers to understand the functionality needed. The developers practice TDD, and automate our FitNesse tests. They have learned how to get the customers to give us good examples of desired and undesired behavior. The Agile Testing Quadrants that form part of the core of our book are as useful for programmers as for anyone else on the team.

Agile testing isn't something for testers only, it's for the whole development team, and involves the customers as well. Our book gives guidance on how to accomplish that.
-- Lisa
 
Vincent Zhao
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Lisa Crispin wrote:

Vincent Zhao wrote:Hello Lisa & Janet,

As a JavaEE developer, sometime involve in application design, is it useful to read this book?

Thanks in advance.


Hi Vincent,
I work on a team of JavaEE developers, and I think they would say yes! As we recommend in the book, my entire team is engaged in testing activities, and committed to delivering the highest quality software. We all work together with the customers to understand the functionality needed. The developers practice TDD, and automate our FitNesse tests. They have learned how to get the customers to give us good examples of desired and undesired behavior. The Agile Testing Quadrants that form part of the core of our book are as useful for programmers as for anyone else on the team.

Agile testing isn't something for testers only, it's for the whole development team, and involves the customers as well. Our book gives guidance on how to accomplish that.
-- Lisa



Hi Lisa,

Thank you so much for replying. I'll try it out.
But I am just wondering whether my whole team accept this methodology or not.
 
Lisa Crispin
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Vincent Zhao wrote:
Hi Lisa,

Thank you so much for replying. I'll try it out.
But I am just wondering whether my whole team accept this methodology or not.



Vincent, your team has to do what works for your situation. If everything is fine with your current process, there's no need to change. However, if you're having problems, then your team needs to find solutions. I recommend that you try doing retrospectives to identify what works well and what's not going so well, then experiment with solutions for the areas that cause pain. Some agile practice or principle might help, or it might be something else.
-- Lisa
 
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