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Does availability matters to employer?

 
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Hi

I was wondering if availability matters when applying for a job. What I mean is: if I say "I require 30 days notice" (instead of the standard 2 weeks) when applying a job, is it going to become a problem for some interviewers?

All my friends say it shouldn't matter, but I am not completely convinced yet. My question is: if it really doesn't matter at all, why would people who had interviewed me in the past always ask about my availability up front in the first interview (before any technical questions) and most of them even ask it before setting up an interview. It really seems like they would not like to waste time interviewing people who are not available anytime soon.

So, what's the deal here? I am really curious about this....
 
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It probably depends on the employer. I can imagine a circumstance where an employer had a project that was time critical or had a lot of resources they were coordinating and would not want the extra hassle of waiting the extra two weeks. On the other hand, if the new position was fairly isolated and no deadlines were looming, they could be flexible with a start date.
If you need 30 days, it may help to explain why you need the extra time (finish up current project, transfer knowledge to a replacement, current employer expects it, etc.).
 
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I'd echo the previous post. To use a personal example I lost out on a contract that I was the first choice on because I wasn't available for a month. Others that I've interviewed have been more accommodating.
 
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Chris Creed wrote:I'd echo the previous post. To use a personal example I lost out on a contract that I was the first choice on because I wasn't available for a month. Others that I've interviewed have been more accommodating.




All depends. Some employers are prepared to wait for the right candidate.
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