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Would it be possible to write a servlet that output the current stack size?

 
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Hi,

As the title suggests, I would like to develop a servlet which could output the current stack size at fixed time intervals. Is this feasible? Can anyone give me any assistance?

Thanks,

GM
 
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Wouldn't the current stack size be local to the current running thread (if it were accessible at all. I don't know that it is)?
 
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Stacks are on a per-Thread basis and thus will always be the same for a request.

With Tomcat, I use the Management application to keep an eye on memory use.

Bill
 
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I doubt it. Although the popular conception of the stack is a linear area of memory that grows in one direction, a stack is actually a collection of frames that are linked together. It's efficient to acquire the memory for the next frame by augmenting a stack pointer, but there are other ways, and even in systems where a stack pointer is maintained thus, some implementations have been known to acquire a new chunk of frame storage from the heap when the existing frame chunk runs out of capacity.
 
Guy Leeds
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Thanks for the replies. I'm at least getting a better understanding of how the stack(s) work.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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