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what do you call 3/4th in english

 
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what do you call 3/4th in english:
1/4=quater:
1/2=half:
what is 3/4=??
 
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depending on context either three quarter or three fourth.

You seriously don't know things like that?
 
Arun Kumar
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i knew about three fourth and three quater but isnt there a one word for that?
like "quater" and "half"
 
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Originally posted by Arun Kumar:
what do you call 3/4th in english:
1/4=quater:
1/2=half:
what is 3/4=??



The fist two, as written, would actually be
"one quarter" and "one half".

3/4 would be "three quarters" or "three fourths" which mean the same thing.
 
Ben Souther
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Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:
You seriously don't know things like that?



I wouldn't know how to say that in any of the Asian languuages.
In fact, I wouldn't have been able to ask that question.
So... he's way ahead of me.
 
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Originally posted by Arun Kumar:
isnt there a one word for that?



Is there one word for that in your first language (which is...?) That's interesting. How about other fractions like 2/3, 3/5, 4/5?
 
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:


Is there one word for that in your first language (which is...?) That's interesting. How about other fractions like 2/3, 3/5, 4/5?



we do have one word for quite common fractions in hindi ..

1/2 = "aadha"
1/4 = "sawa"
3/4 = "paun"
3/2 = "dedh"
5/2 = "adhai"

hmmmm 2/3, 3/5, 4/5 could be new candidates.....
 
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:


Is there one word for that in your first language (which is...?) That's interesting. How about other fractions like 2/3, 3/5, 4/5?



Yes. Most Indian languages have single words for 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4. And these words are not condensed versions like one half to half. They hold out on their own. If I were to say "one half" in my native tongue it would actually mean 1.5 .

Some usages - 3/4 kilo of tomatoes, 1/2 litre milk, 1/4 kilo of chicken, 12 and 1/2 o'clock etc..

But for other fractions, we don't have similar words (or I'm not aware of them). Its only for increments of 1/4.
 
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How about 75% or 75 cents. Or a quarter short of full?

Of course those are not common terms for 3/4 but ones I came up with off the top of my head.

Mark
 
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Originally posted by Arun Kumar:
...what is 3/4=??


"Most."
 
Ben Souther
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Originally posted by Devesh H Rao:

5/2 = "adhai"



Wow, a single word for 5/2.
Does this have to do with your monetary system?
I can't picture that fraction being common enough to warrent it's own word.
 
Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Now that I think about it: I already knew about a "lakh", which means (right?) 100,000. So are there words for other sort of large round numbers too, more than in English? Are there special words for (say) 500, or 5000?
 
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If I were to say "one half" in my native tongue it would actually mean 1.5.



Interesting. That's very compact when everybody undertands the same thing. Is that Hindi again?

The English (I think) say things like "half eight" for 8:30. Feels like the same kind of shorthand since I'd probably say "half past eight" for 8:30. One of the first REXX programs written at Hursley displays the time and uses phrases like just gone, just after, nearly and almost for 5 or 10 minutes either side of the hour. Are those meanings well known to anyone here?

Oh, to the original post, I might call 3/4 "waltz" time.
[ September 23, 2006: Message edited by: Stan James ]
 
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Originally posted by Devesh H Rao:

1/4 = "sawa"


I think it should be pav.Sawa is 1+(1/4)
 
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Originally posted by Devesh H Rao:


1/4 = "sawa"



Correction :
1/4 = "Paav"
5/4 = "Sawwa"
But again, 5/4 actually means "sawwa ek", likewise, 9/4 means "sawwa don", 13/4 = "sawwa teen" etc

In Marathi it is like
1/4 = "paav"
1/2 = "ardha"
3/4 = "paun"
5/4 = "sawwa" (in general)
3/2 = "deed"
5/2 = "adich"
[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: R K Parulekar ]
 
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Interesting!

In Malayalam, we have

1/4 = 'kaal'
1/2 = 'ara'
3/4 = 'mukkaal', which is in fact is short for 'moonu kaal' (three 1/4). This looks different from the Hindi.

When it comes to other fractions, for instance, 5/8 is in fact simplified and written as 1 1/4 which is then read as 'Onne kaal', which translates to '1 and a quarter'.

I wonder how this is in Tamil, because Malayalam is half Tamil and half Hindi/Sanskrit.
 
Arjunkumar Shastry
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As far as origins of these words(in Hindi/Marathi) are concerned,I think we have solved the riddle.!!
Paav is for 1/4.I asked few people.Paav/Pav comes from the word 'Pao',bread in Portuguese.Shape is exactly like quarter.(Portuguese ruled some part of India durng 17th and 18th century)

Any Porutuguese rancher here?
Ardha/Adha comes from ardhya(m),Sanskrit word for half.Pawoon,thats 'pav une',une is minus,so one minus pav becomes 3/4.
Still riddle not fully solved,looking for origins for sawwa(1 + 1/4) and dhai/adhich(2 + 1/2).
 
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wow
plenty of fracions geniouses
ok Australia in english is australia
in chinese is 澳大利亚 or audalia
what is it in hindi malayalam tamil or your indian pick
 
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Here in France , when you go to a bar and ask "un demi" (1/2),
you get 1/4 litre of beer. How strange....
If you ask for "un quart" (1/4) , you usually get ...
No it's not 12,5 cl of beer! You get 25 cl of red wine.

Sometimes instead of saying "I would like 6 eggs", you say
"I would like une demi douzaine" wich is really "half of twelfe".
 
Aj Mathia
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Originally posted by fred Joly:
Here in France , when you go to a bar and ask "un demi" (1/2),
you get 1/4 litre of beer. How strange....
If you ask for "un quart" (1/4) , you usually get ...
No it's not 12,5 cl of beer! You get 25 cl of red wine.

Sometimes instead of saying "I would like 6 eggs", you say
"I would like une demi douzaine" wich is really "half of twelfe".



hahaha
is that the first time you order
or the 6th
coz when i go the sixth time its like " geme a tuees nuuu "(give me a tooheys new)
i end up with a cartons
[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: Ajay Mathew ]
 
Ben Souther
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Originally posted by fred Joly:
Here in France , when you go to a bar and ask "un demi" (1/2),
you get 1/4 litre of beer. How strange....
If you ask for "un quart" (1/4) , you usually get ...
No it's not 12,5 cl of beer! You get 25 cl of red wine.

Sometimes instead of saying "I would like 6 eggs", you say
"I would like une demi douzaine" wich is really "half of twelfe".




"Half a dozen" or "a half a dozen" is a popular expression in the US as well.
[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: Ben Souther ]
 
Devesh H Rao
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Originally posted by R K Parulekar:



But again, 5/4 actually means "sawwa ek", likewise, 9/4 means "sawwa don", 13/4 = "sawwa teen" etc


[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: R K Parulekar ]



But again, 5/4 actually means "sawwa (1/4) and ek (1)", likewise, 9/4 means "sawwa (1/4) and don (2)", 13/4 = "sawwa(1/4) and teen (3)" etc

"sawa ek" has been again shortened to sawa to somehow mean 1.15 over time but sawa points to the fraction 1/4.

marathi and hindi are very close and i guess a mumbaikar will eventually end up mixing them up and not even knowing the difference... a complete sentance in mumbai can easily be made up of marathi, hindi, english and the conversation can be carried out as if everything's fine....


MR R K Parulekar... you from around mumbai...?
 
Devesh H Rao
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Originally posted by Ben Souther:


Wow, a single word for 5/2.
Does this have to do with your monetary system?
I can't picture that fraction being common enough to warrent it's own word.



no we do not have coins for 5/2 or 3/2 ....

I guess it came into effect because of the very frequest usage in buying and selling stuff... "like bhaiya deed kilo tomoto dena" [can you please give me 1.5 kilo tomato] or "adhai litre doodh dena" [can you please give me 2.5 litre of milk]

deed(1.5) or 3/2 is a zipped version of aadha(.5) and ek(1) while adhai(2.5) is again somehow derived from aadha(.5) and do(2).
[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: Devesh H Rao ]
 
Devesh H Rao
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
Now that I think about it: I already knew about a "lakh", which means (right?) 100,000. So are there words for other sort of large round numbers too, more than in English? Are there special words for (say) 500, or 5000?



You heard of a crore ?[1,00,00,000]
 
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i once went to a bank to depost $1,100. I told the bank clerk that I would like to deposit one thousand one hundred dollars (i missed the "and" part - ie, one thousand and one hundred). She thought that I was going to deposit 1000 * 100 dollars and said "Come this way, sir" to a secure area. I was like "whats all this fuzz about"... She burst into laughter when i told her that its just $1,100.
 
Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Devesh --

Yes, but I couldn't recall the word before. Thanks.

So is there a word for "million?" In English, we have no special word for a lakh (one tenth of a million) or a crore (ten million).

Lynnette: that's interesting. Where did this happen? Anyplace I've lived in the States, "one thousand one hundred" would be understood correctly. Where in the world are you?
[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: Ernest Friedman-Hill ]
 
Richard Green
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down under, ernest
 
marc weber
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In Western music, 3/4 time is often a waltz or minuet.

( )
[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: marc weber ]
 
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
Devesh --

Yes, but I couldn't recall the word before. Thanks.

So is there a word for "million?" In English, we have no special word for a lakh (one tenth of a million) or a crore (ten million).

Lynnette: that's interesting. Where did this happen? Anyplace I've lived in the States, "one thousand one hundred" would be understood correctly. Where in the world are you?

[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: Ernest Friedman-Hill ]



No, there is no word for 'million'. It's 10 Lakhs.

Apart from crore, there are others too:

crore = 1,00,00,000 (10 million or 10th of billion)
arab = add 2 more zeros (1 and 9 zeros) (?)
kharab = 1 and 11 zeros (?)

But I guess, no body deal with these two.

 
Devesh H Rao
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
Devesh --

Yes, but I couldn't recall the word before. Thanks.

So is there a word for "million?" In English, we have no special word for a lakh (one tenth of a million) or a crore (ten million).


[ September 24, 2006: Message edited by: Ernest Friedman-Hill ]



I guess it has to do with the numbers being in multiples of 100, so million is nothin more than 10 lakh's

1 = ek
100 = sau [ek * 100]
1000 = hazaar [sau * 100]
100000 = lakh = [hazaar * 100]
10000000 = crore = [lakh * 100]

and thanks to rathi, I had forgotten about these....

1000000000 = arab [crore * 100]
100000000000 = kharab [arab * 100]

I guess the set of people giving these names got bored after counting till a multiple of 100 and named the 100'th multiple something, actually as I am writing this it strikes me that it really is a nice numbering system ....
 
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Hi Devesh,

small addition

1 = ek [Ekai]
10 = Dahai [1 * 10]
100 = Sau (Saikda)[1 * 100]
1000 = hazaar [10 * 100]
10000 = Dus Hazar [100 * 100]
100000 = lakh [1000 * 100]
1000000 = Dus Lakh [10000 * 100]
10000000 = crore = [100000 * 100]
100000000 = Dus Crore
1000000000 = arab [crore * 100]
10000000000 = Dus Arab
100000000000 = kharab [arab * 100]
1000000000000 = Dus Kharab
10000000000000 = Shankh
100000000000000 = Dus Shankh
1000000000000000 = Maha Shankh
10000000000000000 = Dus Maha Shankh
 
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In olden times (my parents generation & grandfather's generation) there were "autki" tables (don't know what is it called in any other language besides Marathi) - which are actually tables for these fractions (1/4, 1/2, 3/4) just like tables for integers 2,3,4 etc. And school children learnt them as young kids -- often that made many of them very sharp & proficient in airthmetic! My grandpa & even dad could come up with exact bill amount even before he'd approach billing counter.

- Manish
 
Devesh H Rao
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Originally posted by Manish Hatwalne:
In olden times (my parents generation & grandfather's generation) there were "autki" tables (don't know what is it called in any other language besides Marathi) - which are actually tables for these fractions (1/4, 1/2, 3/4) just like tables for integers 2,3,4 etc. And school children learnt them as young kids -- often that made many of them very sharp & proficient in airthmetic! My grandpa & even dad could come up with exact bill amount even before he'd approach billing counter.

- Manish



yessss, I remember seeing those tables too in some old books I rummaged around in my nani's [granny] place... they were on lines of log tables and were used for equations having fractions is what I was told....

All thanks to this thread, I am going to look around and try to find it. Calculators have made me brain dead .. need some change...
 
Devesh H Rao
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Originally posted by R K Singh:
Hi Devesh,

10000000000000000 = Dus Maha Shankh



I am going to ask for Dus Maha Shankh as my expected pay, whenever I make up my mind to give an interview for a lark ..LOL....

What is that number any way.... 100 * Crore * Crore
 
ankur rathi
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Originally posted by Manish Hatwalne:
In olden times (my parents generation & grandfather's generation) there were "autki" tables (don't know what is it called in any other language besides Marathi) - which are actually tables for these fractions (1/4, 1/2, 3/4) just like tables for integers 2,3,4 etc. And school children learnt them as young kids -- often that made many of them very sharp & proficient in airthmetic! My grandpa & even dad could come up with exact bill amount even before he'd approach billing counter.

- Manish



My dad is also very proficient in manual arithmetic. I remember, sometime, my dad and we all siblings and cousins used to have competition of adding numbers of any huge bill, and ofcourse my dad won all the times.

God, it was soooooo fun at home!!!
 
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Russian has "polovina" for 1/2 and "poltora" for 1-1/2. I had a professor Poltoratskii. Good old Dr. One-and-a-half!
 
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I have never heard the word three fourths used in common speech here in the UK, the normal term is three quarters. Of course it would be obvious what the meaning was if you were to say three fourths.

One of the things that surprises me about English is that there are not more specific terms for family relationships, thus to specify a grandparents link you must add maternal or paternal, and the term cousin covers several different possibilities.
 
R K Singh
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Originally posted by Devesh H Rao:

MR R K Parulekar... you from around mumbai...?



My guess is Pune
 
R K Singh
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Originally posted by Marcus Green:
One of the things that surprises me about English is that there are not more specific terms for family relationships, thus to specify a grandparents link you must add maternal or paternal, and the term cousin covers several different possibilities.



When it comes to relationship, Hindi is full of words to define different relations:

A small table:

----------------------------------------------------


Did I miss anyone
[ September 25, 2006: Message edited by: R K Singh ]
 
R K Singh
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Originally posted by Ben Souther:

Wow, a single word for 5/2.
Does this have to do with your monetary system?
I can't picture that fraction being common enough to warrent it's own word.



A little bit. Prices in market would be in these figures.
Most of the time people use it to specify the quantity of any item in market specifically while buying vegetables.
[ September 25, 2006: Message edited by: R K Singh ]
 
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