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HOw many certifications??

 
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Hi,

I was just wondering,for those of you who didn't complete/attend college or university and are currently employed in decent programming jobs.How many certifications had you completed before you got jobs??
 
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Hello first off I do have a degree. The number of certs isn't important in my opinion. You should ask what do employers look for?

When I graduated, I got into system support jobs and got MCSE... By the time I did all those exams and the cert, I didn't even work with Windows servers but got into HSBC and work with AS/400. By the time I hated AS/400 I got into development and chose Java over say .NET.

At the end of the day having a cert can only demonstrate you "know" the technology but employers want you to "apply" that technology (hands on). And without hands on (like from resume/CV), they just think you are like any other guy who send in application for interview.
 
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IMO, What really makes the difference is:

-- How much hands-on experience you have in sought-after technologies/frameworks
-- How well you come across in your CV
-- How well you perform in your interview
-- How well developed are your networking and job hunting skills

Your experience could come from paid job(s), volunteer work, self-taught, open-source contribution, etc. Research what the market wants and gain some hands-on experience on those technologies/frameworks/tools.


 
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IMO, the lack of a degree is really hard to overcome. If someone comes really highly recommended, or maybe have 10+ years experience, I may grant the interview. But lacking a college degree, and little experience? It will be tough call, considering that practically every candidate that I review, has a degree.

Not saying that I would reject a candidate (whom I interview) due to lacking a degree -- more like I can't interview everyone, and dropping those without a degree would be very likely.

Henry
 
arulk pillai
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Henry Wong wrote:IMO, the lack of a degree is really hard to overcome. If someone comes really highly recommended, or maybe have 10+ years experience, I may grant the interview. But lacking a college degree, and little experience? It will be tough call, considering that practically every candidate that I review, has a degree.

Not saying that I would reject a candidate (whom I interview) due to lacking a degree -- more like I can't interview everyone, and dropping those without a degree would be very likely.

Henry




Agree.
 
Duran Harris
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Well if I just consider each certfication to be a subject passed at university?I left my university because I wasn't satisfied with the syllabus/education.I think that the only (computing)subjects that I regret not doing are distributed computing,and computer networking.I don't see how a single semester of html/javascript+a semester of mobile computing(midlets) is going to help me at all.That's why I left.Since then I got my SCJP,SCWCD and working exposure to php/mysql.I will start with my SCBCD shortly.I guess it's just unfortunate that I went to such a crummy university because I know for a fact I surpass almost all the 3rd year students there(in terms of what I can do with java,mysql,html)and I am not really good at all.Well,I suppose that if I cant get a job doing java after another 2 certifications then I will pursue a career in 3d graphics and move into something like flash development....But for most people I suppose it is unheard of that people with 2 year college diplomas exceed Comp Sci graduates...
 
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Actually, too many certifications is a red flag itself. And most certs aren't actually good for much more than wallpapering your cubicle.

I'd recommend you find an institution of higher learning you can respect more than the one you left and finish the degree.

With the current state of the economy being what it is, finding a job isn't that easy even with certs/degrees/experience.
 
Duran Harris
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Yes a good university would be ideal.But I think I will hang on untill next year before I register.I'll probably just take 6 subjects next year:Probably precalculus A,precalculus B,Calculus A,Linear Algebra,and 1 or 2 introductory C++ programming modules.
 
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Tim Holloway wrote:Actually, too many certifications is a red flag itself..



Why that, and how many is too many? I could imagine people thinking that he's put to get certs by former employers because he was not good enough to get hands on experience in projects. That's what you're aiming at?

 
Tim Holloway
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Marcel Wentink wrote:

Tim Holloway wrote:Actually, too many certifications is a red flag itself..



Why that, and how many is too many? I could imagine people thinking that he's put to get certs by former employers because he was not good enough to get hands on experience in projects. That's what you're aiming at?



There's no hard and fast number, but probably over 6 is a good start. The reason that certs don't carry much credibility is that so many of them are based on memorize-and-regurgitate rather than on demonstration of long-term ability. Some of us (myself included) have a natural aptitude for test-taking, so what the cert reflects as much as anything else is simply that aptitude. But an aptitude for test-taking itself isn't much of a job skill unless you're in Civil Service.

Another reason is that you can find certs in just about anything, but beyond a certain small core set, the criteria for certification is so lightweight that it doesn't signify anything. Likewise for certifications in narrow specialties - a cert for SAP is one thing. Being certified in Red Hat Linux DNS, however, would be almost silly, since A) there's nothing all that magic about DNS on Red Hat and B) anyone hired to do DNS on Red Hat systems would almost certainly be expect to be competent in a LOT more than DNS.
 
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