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How to see the partition that I created using Windows

 
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I would like to know how I could view my partitions that I created using the Windows shrink volume on my Linux installation? Under Places menu tab on the Linux screen, I see something called New Volume and I want to know what does this mean?

I see the following,

SW_Preload

New Volume

New Volume

CD-RW...

Why do I have two of them (New Volume). Could it be that I have created two such partitions on my Windows installation??

What I actually want to acheive is that I have a 40 GB partition on which I would have my Maven Local repository and I want to make use of this same repository for both Linux and Windows. How to do this?
 
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First, did you format the space you freed up after doing a shrink volume?

My guess is that the two New Volume entries reflect two partitions that have already been formatted, but have not been mounted. Try running "sudo fdisk -l" from a terminal and post the results. This should tell us exactly how the disk is partitioned.
 
Joe San
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Here is what I got when I said sudo fdisk -1 at the terminal.



I have created in Windows the following partition,
C; That contains the actual partition
EISA partition, I deleted this and created a new partition out of this
D: A new 40 GB partition where I would be installing all the softwares on my machine that I intend to use.
 
Peter Johnson
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Here's is what I think you have:

/dev/sda1 is the Windows recovery partition. (I think that in another post you stated that you have a laptop, and laptop vendors typically use a separate partition for the files necessary to restore the laptop to the factory disk layout.)

/dev/sda2 is your C: drive in Windows

/dev/sda3 is the 40GB you freed up. It looks like you formatted it also

In Linux, under the Places menu, the "SW_Preload" entry is for /dev/sda1. The two "New Volume" entries are for /dev/sda2 and /dev/sda3. These entries will disappear if you add then to /etc/fstab so that they are mounted automatically.

By the way, if in Windows you would give a name to your C: and D: drives, those names would show up in the Places menu, instead of "New Volume".
 
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