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can I bring sample code to the interview with prospective employer ?

 
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When I go to interview with prospective future employer, Is it professional to bring some of my sample code (very little and isolated, won't cause any information leak) that I am doing with my current employer ?
 
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(very little and isolated, won't cause any information leak)



If that is actual production code then it is a problem. No matter how little / small the code is, you are violating the NDA. This might work against you since the prospective employer might wonder 'Hmm will be do something similar with the code that he writes here ?'

It is also not common to carry around sample code. You never know what type of questions an interviewer might ask and there is no way you can prove that it was you that wrote the sample program / code
 
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I guess you can take screenshots of some of the web applications you built. Even though it does not prove that you did it, but it shows that you take pride in your work.

As far as the code is concerned, you need to check the licensing agreement. I am not too sure, only once I was asked in an interview to bring in some sample code. It was optional and I had to write code in the interview anyway.
 
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arulk pillai wrote:I guess you can take screenshots of some of the web applications you built. Even though it does not prove that you did it, but it shows that you take pride in your work.


If signing a NDA, wouldn't this violate it too?

I recommend just writing some code on your own that you are the owner of. Maybe when you are playing with a new technology to learn.
 
arulk pillai
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If signing a NDA, wouldn't this violate it too?




That is true. Didn't think of that.
 
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Dude. seriously. If you can write code at work you can write code at home.
 
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I've never been to an interview where the interviewer said "So, do you happen to have any code on you?" and honestly, that would seem odd to me. Typically, the code an interviewer wants to see is code they ask you to write.
 
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Gregg Bolinger wrote:I've never been to an interview where the interviewer said "So, do you happen to have any code on you?" and honestly, that would seem odd to me. Typically, the code an interviewer wants to see is code they ask you to write.



That's true. It's rarely asked because it's rarely provided. But I regularly ask individuals what code they write outside of work, and it's a big plus if they can show something to me. I always manage to provide a link to my publicly available source code to prospective employers, and if they're not interested in it it's a giant minus for me.

One of the great inefficiencies in the interview process to me is that it's so difficult to see a person's actual work product - so anything that allows it to become visible strikes me as a huge advantage. Why wouldn't people be interested in it?

Cheers!

Luke
 
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That nobody else brings in code is exactly why should take it upon yourself to do so.

That hiring managers think that asking for on-the-spot code samples is a valid indication of coding skill is absurd.

What if you're applying for a chef's job? You haven't been asked to bring in sample dishes, but you bring some anyway. Two cooks, both seem qualified, but one of them brings in an amazing lasagna and brownies to die for. Who wins?
 
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I think it's a good idea to bring sample source codes. But it mustn't be source code that were written on work. Sign NDA or not, I don't think that is right. But from recruiters standpoint, I think the best way for both sides is to ask the candidate takes an exam then the evaluator could review source code.

From candidates standpoint, I think it's a good idea to bring your own source code (not from workplace) to demonstrate your skills.
 
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I have frequently been asked for code samples and I have always asked for it when I've been performing an interview.

You can tell a lot about a candidate from reading through their code sample. In particular, we're looking for someone that has a strong working methodology and commenting style. I would much rather hire a less talented programmer than works in a thorough manner, than a more talented programmer that is sloppy.

 
arulk pillai
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Andy Lester wrote:That nobody else brings in code is exactly why should take it upon yourself to do so.

That hiring managers think that asking for on-the-spot code samples is a valid indication of coding skill is absurd.

What if you're applying for a chef's job? You haven't been asked to bring in sample dishes, but you bring some anyway. Two cooks, both seem qualified, but one of them brings in an amazing lasagna and brownies to die for. Who wins?




It also shows that you take pride in your work. I generally take some screenshots, but haven't thought about taking the sample code. I always believe in doing something different to what others are doing. I can see a valuable point that Andy is making.
 
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