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How to face barriers in career progression?

 
Greenhorn
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Hi,
I joined in one of the top Service Management company after immediatly compling my studies.
I felt I was not gaining enough technical skill and I was bound to follow the structure/frameworks and tools imposed by the client.
It went like this for 2 years. Then I felt if I move to Product Development company, there I would get more chances of using the latest technologies. So I moved to one the top most Product Development company.
I am stuck here for last 3.5 years in a single project, where we use only JSP and lot of Javascript and few Plain Java classes.
About 3 years here I worked in L2 support, fixing the issues only.

When I see my career I even didnt have a chance to work with technologies like EJB or Spring or even Strutus. Never seen how an application server works.

If the situation is like this how can anyone grow his career as techie. Please suggest!!

Thanks,
~ Mamidi
 
Author
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mamidi subrahmanyam wrote:When I see my career I even didnt have a chance to work with technologies like EJB or Spring or even Strutus. Never seen how an application server works.

If the situation is like this how can anyone grow his career as techie.



Learn it yourself on your own time.

Get a book on Struts (or whatever) and read it. Write a project of your own at home using it. Maybe write a household calendar application. Just something to exercise your own skills.

Chances are your company isn't going to spend the time to have you learn something new, so you have to do it on your own.
 
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In addition to what Andy was suggesting, If you really feel stagnated, then device a plan to move on. Your moving on plan should include


-- Preparing a good resume.
-- Keeping an eye-out for jobs that will give you the opportunity to learn some of the sought-after technologies/frameworks, etc
-- Working on self-taught projects or contributing to open-source projects in way that gives you the much needed experience and confidence in the sought-after technologies and frameworks. Add those self-taught projects to your resume.
-- While gaining hands-on experience, invest in books to learn the core concepts of a particular technology/framework, so that you can be confident and perform better in your interviews.
 
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Technically, if you're doing JSP, you're using an "application server" (probably Tomcat). You may not be using the full J2EE stack, but you're working with the most marketable part of it.

However, if you were to apply with a position with me, the bigger issues would be the architecture you've been working with. While Javascript is a very useful skill to have, raw JSP would be an alarm bell to me.

The reason for that is that JSP-based systems don't reflect Enterprise-level disciplines. I've been assisting someone recently to do maintenance on a JSP-based system that meets your description precisely and it's a real nightmare. The business logic and the display definition are all muddled together. It's the modern-day equivalent of spaghetti code.

I'd strongly recommend that you learn an MVC framework and develop proficiency in a discipline that separates concerns into manageable subsystems. I personally think one of the best of such platforms is JavaServer Faces (JSF), although Struts is what most people around here are using. Then again, I live in a rather backwards neighbourhood.


 
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