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Is it worth it?

 
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Hi,
I tried to deploy an application using Struts but considering the time & effort involved in understanding the entire application , I was left frustated & gave it up mid-way.Any comments?
 
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I've meant to try out Struts at home for some months already but haven't had the drive to do that just yet. Mostly it's been a time issue but some blame could be shed on the fact that I haven't had good-enough material at hand (and due to all the other things I should be reading first, I doubt I'll manage to try Struts until '04...). A motive (an exercise project) would be helpful I guess.
 
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Vedhas,
I am also struggling a bit with STRUTS so this may mean a bit more coming from me than from an experienced user.
I would say that it will be worth it once it all clicks and you understand. While trying to learn STRUTS I can see how much time it will save in the long run.
If you simply look at all the classes that STRUTS already provides for things like form validation, etc, that is how much work they are saving you.
My only concern or question is, is STRUTS the framework to use. I know there are others out there and STRUTS is fairly new in comparison. But being that it is a Jakarta baby, it has some following.
Keep working and and maybe someday we will both "get it"
 
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I'm not going to deny it's a challenge to pick struts up and learn it on your own. However, I will say that it's not impossible, either! There are a few very good, simple, apps out there that you can walk through, along with descriptions. The key is, like any other learning process, to start with the basics and gradually add on more pieces as you understand it.
Just now, a quick trip to Husted.com (http://husted.com/struts/) found me a whole bunch of examples on SourceForge.net:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/struts
In answer to your question, though, I'll say that it's definitely worth it. I (and the rest of my team) maintain a site with 6 different Look and Feel sets based off company affiliation. Some content is the same, some is different. Believe me, I don't want to maintain 6 pages with the same content! Struts and Tiles have saved us time, money, and earned me a promotion by doing so.
So stick with it--it's hard at first, but the payoffs are immense.
 
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Hi there,
My first experience with Struts was developing an enterprise application using Struts 1.0. I left with a mixed reaction to the whole framework because it seemed to introduce a lot of complexity that just wasn't needed (ex: Do I REALLY have to to create all those form beans? Do I REALLY have to create all those action classes? How do I deal with frames using the Struts tag library?)
On the other hand, I am now developing an enterprise application using Struts 1.1 RC 1 and it's nothing but a joy to work with. You can do away with the form beans and define them in your configuration files instead. You can do away with the action classes and write methods instead. Frames are now handled by the tag library. And Struts now includes tiles, the validator framework, and -- most recently -- a beta version of JSF.
So if you're using Struts 1.0 give Struts 1.1 a try and see what you think.
Darryl
 
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I agree with the above posts that Struts takes a while to learn (as do most frameworks), but you don't have to start off with all of Struts.
Starting out with a few basic features doesn't take long to master and then you can add on more as you go. The basic flow is easy to understand.
 
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If you are giving Struts a go, definately start with v1.1. The reason why I wrote the book was because I had a development team and we started with the v.9 release. There wasn't any good documentation at that point. However, even with the lack of documentation we built a large scale application that had over 100 entry form in far less time then if we would have written our own MVC model code.
The structure of the book is such that a Java developer with little or no Struts experience can read it from cover to cover and when you're done will be able to start building an application. Considering that this is accomplished in ~130 pages, it doesn't take that long to read. I've had people post on Amazon that in a weekend they were able to start using Struts on a commercial product without any prior experience with the framework.
Sue
 
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hello Daryl, or anyone in here:


from Daryl:
...You can do away with the form beans and define them in your configuration files instead. You can do away with the action classes and write methods instead...


I don't really have experience in struts except for doing proof-of-concept code exercises which didn't really raise my appreciation of struts. I found your statement above interesting though. That is doing away with form beans and action classes ... and the alternatives you mentioned. Can you please explain a little further about these? e.g. what components, if any, did you replace the form beans and action classes with?
Thanks.
[ May 28, 2003: Message edited by: boyet silverio ]
 
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I did take a look at struts and a number of other frameworks like expresso, tapestry, webwork or puakma. None of them is really easy. The advantage of struts seems to me, that it is the framework with the best documentation. There are a number of books about struts, good examples on different websites and a growing community of developers.
 
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There is a learning curve for struts. Once you finish that using struts is easy.
 
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