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Mr. Ford, what is your opinion on J2EE Web Development vs LAMP and ASP

 
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Mr. Ford,
What is your opinion on J2EE, in terms of development time, scalability, and speed of execution vs similar competing technologies like LAMP and ASP?
It seems that for many small and medium sized projects, LAMP does great, and is relatively easy to develop. And ASP as well, even though your stuck on MS OS's, supports good rapid development that has a reliable implementation (I do quite a lot of ASP at my company). I have yet to program J2EE professionally (I've done lots of Servlets, JSPs, and EJBs on my own using Tomcat, Apache, JBuilder, J2 SDK), but it seems that the real large scale stuff needs J2EE's maturity, scalability and rich library.
The simple question is, how do you know when you actually need J2EE (with all of it's complexity vs the relative simplicity of LAMP and ASP)?
Also, J2EE projects, due to their complexity, have a relatively mediocre record of success (on time, scalable, good execution speed, etc.) - so does your book cover the possible pitfalls and how to avoid them?
Thanks very much!
 
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I feel the decision about simplicity is a personal one. For simple applications one can easily use a combination of JSP/HTML and servlets. It does not get any more complex than ASP and at the same time one has the feeling of comfort that should one need to scale it up, J2EE technology will not run out of solutions.
Personally I feel more comfortable programming in JSP maybe because I learnt it before I learnt ASP and have been using it longer.
...Dinesh
 
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What is your opinion on J2EE, in terms of development time, scalability, and speed of execution vs similar competing technologies like LAMP and ASP?


Both LAMP and ASP are good for small, simple apps. However, they both suffer from maintenance and scalability problems. You can create the same kinds of problems (and speed of development) in Java if you like! Both LAMP and ASP rely on scripting languages, which are notorious for problems when code gets big (loose typing, too much cryptic syntax, etc.).

The simple question is, how do you know when you actually need J2EE (with all of it's complexity vs the relative simplicity of LAMP and ASP)?


It depends! Note, however, that small projects that do useful work tend to stick around and grow. A little extra time and effort (and, when using a good framework, it really is just a little) pays off when the boss comes and wants to expand it.

Also, J2EE projects, due to their complexity, have a relatively mediocre record of success (on time, scalable, good execution speed, etc.) - so does your book cover the possible pitfalls and how to avoid them?


My book does indeed address this. However, don't lay this at Java's door. Better to say that complex distributed applications (no matter what the technology) have a high failure rate. In fact, I think Java's track record is better than others for this kind of project. My book encourages good architecture, design, and intelligent addition of features, which help keep large, complex projects under control.
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