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Description of non-functional requirements

 
Greenhorn
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Hi all,

If I am ask to explain non-functional requirements of my project in the third part of the test, how could I proceed?

I mean, I wouldn't know how to explain, for example:

  • How does my project handle manageability?
  • How does my project handle extensibility?


  • I really don't know how to explain these questions, even doing project.

    Could someone give me some examples of answers to these questions?

    Thanks
     
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 86
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    Your assignment might require you to provide for some extensibility/manageability in the design. Look at your requirements carefully to see if this is hinted at/specified.

     
    Greenhorn
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    For a requirement to be a true requirement it has to be verifiable, otherwise you can't even call it a requirement.
    Having that said, look at your requirements and at your project, and try to see if your project meets them successfully or not. You can base your response on that.
     
    Ranch Hand
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    If you can't identify non-functional requirements and write about them as they relate to your application, you most likely are not prepared for this test. And most likely shouldn't be taking it. Oracle doesn't care, they are simply collecting your money.

    Aside, another illustration of why the SCEA certification is an industry joke...
     
    author and jackaroo
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    Which is only true if you believe the only reason for the SCEA certification is to be able to state that you are an architect.

    Personally I know of no architects who would accept that another person is an architect on the strength of them being Sun certified alone. And I believe that most members of this forum are interested in bettering their own knowledge, possibly with the aim of one day becoming an architect.

    Given that, I think it can be very worthwhile for someone to attempt this certification, even if they do not have a perfect answer for every possible question.
     
    Ranch Hand
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    Hi,

    I view certifications from the below perspectives in the order of importance.

    1) It gives me an opportunity(push me) to read lots of stuffs related to the certification. If i don't take a certification, though i will get to know about the topic but not in-depth. It gives me a habit of reading books. If not, i seldom read.

    2) It gives me an opportunity to explore into new areas though i have been in the field for the past 10 years. For example, when i studied for this certification, i come to know about network topology, load balancing, business continuity planning, disaster recovery etc. If not, i won't look into those topics.

    3) It makes my resume to stand out from the crowd and the preparation for the exams gives me the habit to read more and solve a problem if an assignment is given. So, i can get more interview calls.

    4) It gives an edge for me to negotiate $$$.

    Cheers,
    Kuppusamy.V.
     
    Ryan Fernandes
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    Frank Bennett wrote:If you can't identify non-functional requirements and write about them as they relate to your application, you most likely are not prepared for this test. And most likely shouldn't be taking it. Oracle doesn't care, they are simply collecting your money.
    Aside, another illustration of why the SCEA certification is an industry joke...




    Spread the love mate... provide some suggestions useful to the OP

    ... and trust me you'll feel a whole lot better than flinging some flamebait in this forum
     
    Ranch Hand
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    I would like to second Ryan's post here - well put.
     
    Jimmy Clark
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    Andrew, your comments are very good, I feel. The preparation for the exam is the best part rather than actually having the certificate from Sun (or Oracle). I attained the original SCEA certificate in 2004 and was very disappointed with the new "version." As a result, I stopped promoting and recommending this program.

    Diego, The following are the key system qualities that you should be aware of. They present the key areas that a software architect typically needs to focus on, while others are taking care of OO design, writing code, testing, etc.

    Security

    Scalability

    Reusability

    Availability

    Reliability

    Manageability

    Performance

    Extensibility


    Good luck!
     
    Diego Marques
    Greenhorn
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    Frank Bennett wrote:If you can't identify non-functional requirements and write about them as they relate to your application, you most likely are not prepared for this test. And most likely shouldn't be taking it. Oracle doesn't care, they are simply collecting your money.

    Aside, another illustration of why the SCEA certification is an industry joke...



    Maybe you are right... Maybe I'm not ready to take this test...

    If I were, I wouldn't need to be here asking questions. I could be here replying questions, trying to help other people, rather than saying useless things to them... Don't you agree with me?

    Anyway, maybe if I am not ready to take this test, I'm preparing myself. And not just for this test. It is also for a career as an architect. Think of, for example, if you as an architect, have to explain the manageability things of your system to the client or to the development team. This is the question that I did. Don't you think it is important?
     
    Diego Marques
    Greenhorn
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    And thanks everybody for your help.

    It has been very worthwile for me!
     
    Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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