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ORM Frameworks

 
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Hi,

Does your book mention any pitfalls or antipatterns related ORM frameworks such as Hibernate.

Thanks.
 
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Hi Anil, your question is related to the question Wouter asked earlier.
https://coderanch.com/t/508679/JDBC/java/ORM-Antipatterns

I have a chapter describing how some ORM users confuse "model" with "table," and this confusion impacts their application design. Martin Fowler calls this the Anemic Domain Model: http://martinfowler.com/bliki/AnemicDomainModel.html

The confusion between model and table is pretty common in the Ruby, PHP, Python, and Perl developer communities, but I haven't found this to be as much of a problem in the Java community.

My advise is to decouple the model from the database access object. Treat them as two separate objects.
 
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