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confusion in jsf

 
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Hello,
I am a beginner of JSF, As i know basically JSF is a specification of java community. And there are some vendors who implement that specification.
Can anybody tell me name of the vendors who implement tghe jsf specification. like sun and apache etc.
what is icefaces, myfaces is these are the implementation.
And if you people have any tutorial link, please share it with me.

Thanks.
 
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Welcome to the JavaRanch, Roby!

There's core JSF and there's JSF extensions. The core JSF was defined by Sun and is part of the JEE 5 standard. JSF extensions are custom tagsets that provide abilities above and beyond the standard.

For the more up-to-date (JEE) containers, the core JSF implementation is provided by the container. For older (J2EE) systems, you usually have to add an implementation jar to your WAR. Mostly that's either the Sun Reference Implementation or the Apache MyFaces core implementation. Both are functionally equivalent, since they have to rigidly conform to spec.

The Apache MyFaces project includes not only a core JSF implementation, but also several extension tagsets, including Tomahawk, Trinidad, and Tobago. IceFaces is a set of JSF extensions that was formerly commercial, but is now open-source. Another set of extensions is the Red Hat/JBoss RichFaces tagsets. RichFaces and IceFaces provide many of the same features, so usually you'd use only one or the other. Tomahawk is also somewhat like RichFaces and IceFaces, but not as much similar as RichFaces and IceFaces are to each other.
 
roby george
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Tim,
Thanks for your valuable information.
As I understand that JSF is a specification and SunRI, and Apache MyFaces is the implementation of that specification. And as you told that old container like tomcat is not have in build facility(Not have jar file of JSF in his lib folder) of JSF, now a days latest container is able to provide that
features in build. so we dont need JSF1.* or 2.* jar, the container provide that one. Or you want to say that old container is not support JSF features.

Both SunRI and Apache MyFaces have the same jar, i mean name of the jar file and the directory structure of that jar.
So these two(SUNRI, Apache MyFaces) are only the implementation of JSF spec, or is there another.
IceFaces and Richfaces is JSF extension, so when we want to use any one of them, then we need the core jsf jar like SUNRI or ApacheMyfaces or they have implemented the JSF spec itself. which type of facility is provided by these JSF extensions.

Please correct me if i understand anything wrong.
And Please give me the Useful tutorial link.


Thanks.
 
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