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Document/Literal versus Document/literal wrapped

 
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Good Day,

Looking at Listing 9. Document/literal wrapped SOAP message for myMethod from Which style of WSDL should I use? -




And from Ivan's study guide, page 36, defined as Document/literal.



Looking at these two, make me think that Ivan's is also Document/literal wrapped, where the wrapper is the purchaseOrder element.

Any thoughts?

Regards,
Dan


 
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Hi!
Actually, according to your reasoning, everything would be Document/Literal Wrapped since the Basic Profile only allows one child element of the SOAP body element.
I feel it is a matter of distinction which perhaps only can be done by a human:
- In the first case, there is an artificial construct, an element named after the method/operation that is invoked, that wraps the parameters.
The added element works only as a container in order to make the request Basic Profile compliant. We can understand the request and the operation would be able to produce a result even without the wrapper.
- In the second case, the XML representation of a purchase order is enclosed in the SOAP message. There is no need to add anything that does not belong to the purchase order.
If we remove the <purchaseOrder> element, we are left with a collection of data which we do not know what they represent.

I hope this helps you separate the two cases.
Best wishes!
 
Dan Drillich
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Ivan Krizsan wrote:Hi!
Actually, according to your reasoning, everything would be Document/Literal Wrapped since the Basic Profile only allows one child element of the SOAP body element.



I agree with you, especially since I'm biased towards Document/Literal Wrapped due to this article. The article has a section for that matter .... Why not use document/literal wrapped all the time?

In general I think that Document/Literal Wrapped makes a very strong line between the protocol level (SOAP) and the application's content, by enclosing the application's content within a distinct element.

Regards,
Dan
 
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Ivan Krizsan wrote: In the first case, there is an artificial construct, an element named after the method/operation that is invoked, that wraps the parameters.
The added element works only as a container in order to make the request Basic Profile compliant.
Best wishes!



Ivan, sorry but I got lost when I read the word "that" in your answer. What does "that" refer to in your answer...does it mean "x" and "y" or "myMethod"...these are all wrappers in a way and hence I didn't understand the answer which otherwise reads like a great answer. I want to be certain of what I understood. Please consolidate my understanding by letting me know what "that" refers to in your answer quoted above.
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