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Greenhorn
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Can anyone explain the output : b h hn x

The String arg constructor calls its superclass constructor and that explains the b h in the output. I cannot understand the hn. What about the no arg superclass constructor?

Can anyone just run me through the above example?
 
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Just follow the call path, house(string) calls house() calls building(); The "hn x" should be the easiest to follow as that is via the first call.

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Line 19 calls line 12. Line 14 calls line 11. There's an invisible call to "super" at the beginning of House's no-argument constructor, inserted by the compiler; that goes to line 3, which prints "b". Then control returns to line 11, which prints "h". Then control returns to line 15, which prints "hn x". Then control goes back to line 20, and the program exits. The "Building" constructor with a String argument is never used.
 
Sanjana Sharma
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Thanks.

So in what condition will the Building String arg constructor will be invoked.
1. if there is a this(); defined in the no arg building constructor?

any other case?
 
Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Sanjana Sharma wrote:
So in what condition will the Building String arg constructor will be invoked.



Without changing the Building or House code? Only if somebody used 'new Building("x")' . Generally, you might want House(String) to call Building(String); you'd do that like

 
Sanjana Sharma
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So two cases:
1. if we had

2.

or we simply called Building("x");

Correct me if i am wrong.
 
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Sanjana Sharma wrote:

When you say this(); , you are invoking the no arguement constructor of the Building. So just think what will happen when you call the no argument contructor of the Building from the no argument contructor of the Building itself .

Why don't you try compiling it and see the result ...

 
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Sanjana Sharma wrote:
Can anyone explain the output : b h hn x

The String arg constructor calls its superclass constructor and that explains the b h in the output. I cannot understand the hn. What about the no arg superclass constructor?

Can anyone just run me through the above example?



By writing a no argument constructor, you are forcing the child classes to add a constructor with super();
 
Sanjana Sharma
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I got it. thanks a lot..
 
prem pillai
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Sanjana Sharma wrote:I got it. thanks a lot..



what? Tell us your current understanding ...
 
Sanjana Sharma
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I complied the code with different combinations.

if I try to compile : , i will be invoking the same constructor again for which complier throws a error.
 
prem pillai
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Good .... So you have learned two major things from this thread.
1) Recursive invocation of a constructor is not allowed.
2) To try out things yourself before posting a query ..

Now can you think about why recurion is not allowed in constructors?
 
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Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:Line 19 calls line 12. Line 14 calls line 11. There's an invisible call to "super" at the beginning of House's no-argument constructor, inserted by the compiler; that goes to line 3, which prints "b". Then control returns to line 11, which prints "h". Then control returns to line 15, which prints "hn x". Then control goes back to line 20, and the program exits. The "Building" constructor with a String argument is never used.




Very correct said.I am fully agree with you.
 
Sanjana Sharma
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Ya very correctly explained.

Prem Sir, we cant have recursive constructor calls , cos constructor invocation marks the creation of an instance. so recursive calls dont make sense.

Correct me if i am wrong and i missed something.
 
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Not "ya" or "cos", please.
 
Sanjana Sharma
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i apologize for the usage.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Apologies accepted
 
Sanjana Sharma
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So , was i right on the reasoning for recursive constructor invocation?
if not, correct me
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Varun Saini,
Your post was moved to a new topic.
 
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