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LinkedList and remove

 
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Hello!

I have a theoretical question here. I have this class OrderedList that represents element in ascending order.


Now I'm supposed to implement a method remove into the class OrderedList.

I thought that I could implement this method in the same way as get, size and iterator are implemented ie



I mean ; there is a method boolean remove(E obj) in java.util.LinkedList<E>Class. But I can't use that one here?

The answer looks like this:


Why do I have to do it this way?

Anders
 
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But I can't use that one here?


Why not?
 
Anders Kviback
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This is a "paper and pen" issue. I don't do any programming. 1. But you mean that it is OK to just write:

2. Well, put it this way, what's the difference?

Anders
 
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The difference basically is that if you program the logic yourself, you write more code, have more code to maintain in the future and have higher probability of bugs in that code, since core JDK classes have been already proved bug-free by millions of users.

In any case, I'd consider two possible different approaches:

1) Use an ArrayList instead of LinkedList to keep the data in. With ArrayList, you can efficiently perform binary searches (there are JDK methods for that) and random access.

2) Use a TreeSet to keep the data in. It keeps data sorted without the need to write a single line of code. Granted, it does not allow duplicates and you'll have to program index access yourself, but since your requirements are quite vague, it might be worth considering.
 
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Martin Vajsar wrote:The difference basically is that if you program the logic yourself, you write more code, have more code to maintain in the future and have higher probability of bugs in that code, since core JDK classes have been already proved bug-free by millions of users.



On the other hand, by doing it yourself a time or two you learn more about the building blocks of the tools you'll be using day-in and day-out later. If the OP is at the "learning about data structures" stage of his education, then it's worth slogging through it.
 
Anders Kviback
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Thanks for answering,

this is, as you propably understand, a java datastructure course. A very interesting course but sometimes a bit tricky.

Thanks again, Anders
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Anders Kviback wrote:Thanks for answering,

this is, as you propably understand, a java datastructure course. A very interesting course but sometimes a bit tricky.

Thanks again, Anders



So, where are you now? Do you still have a question?
 
Anders Kviback
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Sorry about that, no I don't have a question. I got the answer.

Anders
 
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