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Problem running ByteStream example code in eclipse

 
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Hi. I am getting FileNotFoundException when i run the following code in eclipse.



The error is as follows
Exception in thread "main" java.io.FileNotFoundException: xanadu.txt (The system cannot find the file specified)
at java.io.FileInputStream.open(Native Method)
at java.io.FileInputStream.<init>(Unknown Source)
at java.io.FileInputStream.<init>(Unknown Source)
at com.rajiv.io.CopyBytes.main(CopyBytes.java:14)


I have put the "xanadu.txt" file in the same package where this code exists. i.e under the com folder.

Do I need to put it somewhere else?

Thanks
 
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Try placing your file(s) in directory returned by System.getProperty("user.dir");.
 
Rajiv Rai
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Thanks Kemal it works.. but just for understanding
where do we need to put the files while working
in and IDE like eclipse.

 
Kemal Sokolovic
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When using an IDE you should place files you're trying to read in the root directory of your project. If you're using command line the file should be in the same folder (package) where the .class file you're reading from is.
 
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To put it differently: the IDE uses a different folder structure, so the location of the file has to match that folder structure. You could use a file chooser to find your files, instead.
 
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:You could use a file chooser to find your files, instead.



@Rajiv Rai:

Or you could use an absolute path. Or you could look at the "Run Configurations..." selection on the "Run" menu in Eclipse, where I think you can view and change the current directory.

Whenever you specify relative path to a file, rather than an absolute path, it has to be realtive to something. When running a command in a terminal window, relative paths are taken to be relative to the current working directory--the directory you're "in" when you invoke the command. When launching Java from an IDE, however, it's not obvious what the "current" directory will be. It's basically whatever the IDE chooses it to be, though by default it's probably something sensible like the project's root directory. If it is, though, that's only by convention.
 
Rajiv Rai
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I have another doubt in this at the following line

out.write(c);

'c' is defined as an int so how and where does the conversion
from int to char happens when writing the output?

@Campbell
How does using a filechooser helps here?
i just had a brief glimpse of that and that is some GUI related API or concept
How does it relate to what am doing here ?
 
Campbell Ritchie
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A file chooser would help you to find the correct file. Once the file is found, there is no problem about non‑existent files.
You have got at least three different suggestions, which would each help you to sort out your problem. Thank you Kemal and Jeff.
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Rajiv Rai wrote:I have another doubt in this at the following line

out.write(c);

'c' is defined as an int so how and where does the conversion
from int to char happens when writing the output?



There is no conversion from int to char. If you read the docs for that method, and then click the link where it says it's implementing the method defined in the parent class, you'll see that a conversion from int to byte is taking place.

As for how, it describes the end result, so we can take an educated guess that it would be by casting, and as for where, well, obviously it must be inside that method, or in a method it calls. The source code is in the src.zip file that came with the JDK download, so you can look for yourself.
 
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