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Hudson Continuous Integration in Practice

 
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Author/s    : Ed Burns, Winston Prakash
Publisher   : McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
Category   : Miscellaneous Java
Review by : Jeanne Boyarsky
Rating        : 7 horseshoes

"Hudson Continuous Integration in Practice" targets developers with system admins as a secondary audience. It assumes Java knowledge. It doesn't assume you know any tool in particular that Hudson works with (Ant/Maven, Junit, etc) but it is more helpful if you already know them for more understanding.

I think pieces of the book serve different audiences. You could learn about Hudson on a high level and how to integrate it with different tools. Or you could learn how to write a plugin - something I've found tricky from the documentation online. There are also good tips on maintaining your Hudson instance well. I particularly liked the description of setting up slaves and the description of "containing code."

There were a few places I felt the code could have been edited better. Like AbtractBuil vs AbstractBuild and HTML entities in the Java code. But they didn't get in the way of reading.

One thing I really liked about the book is that it contains something for everyone. For me, the plugin chapters would have made the book worth it all on its own.

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Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for writing this review on behalf of CodeRanch.

More info at Amazon.com
 
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