• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Ron McLeod
  • Paul Clapham
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • paul wheaton
  • Rob Spoor
  • Devaka Cooray
Saloon Keepers:
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
  • Frits Walraven
  • Tim Moores
Bartenders:
  • Mikalai Zaikin

Code examples for an entry-level developer

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 211
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of code samples that are/were used in a professional setting. For example a development manager might hand out "task X" to an entry level developer, so I'm wondering what something like X would typically look like when finished, and also maybe how many hours it would be expected to take.

I realize this might be hard to come by since companies typically don't share their code and that it varies greatly, but I'm just looking for something to help bridge the gap between professional and academic code.
 
Author
Posts: 3473
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Google is your friend. With experience you get better at researching things. Even with 12+ years of experience, I still fall back to Google and my blog to get things done. This is also the reason why you should start a blog as well as a repository of you experience, and also as a learning tool.
 
Rancher
Posts: 2759
32
Eclipse IDE Spring Tomcat Server
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you are familiar with any popular Open source products, you might want to download the code. You can learn a lot of things debugging through Hibernate, Spring and Apache commons.
 
Author
Posts: 27
5
Mac IntelliJ IDE Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think as mentioned by Jayesh, you should take a look at open source projects. A number of firms actually open source stuff, like Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Netflix.
https://github.com/goldmansachs
https://github.com/Netflix

This is all real code they built for their own use and released, so it should be a good indicator of what real code look like. Even better would be for you to contribute to open source; then you can pick up real tasks and execute them, plus you can include your github profile on your CV. I saw a CV last week from someone who was a contributor to Mockito which I found very impressive.

If you're just looking for more programming experience in general, check out http://hackerrank.com and https://codility.com/ as a really good way to get your programming skills up.
 
Marshal
Posts: 79039
375
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome to the Ranch
 
Sam Atkinson
Author
Posts: 27
5
Mac IntelliJ IDE Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks very much! It's lovely to be here
 
Tyson Lindner
Ranch Hand
Posts: 211
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Sam Atkinson wrote:I think as mentioned by Jayesh, you should take a look at open source projects. A number of firms actually open source stuff, like Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Netflix.
https://github.com/goldmansachs
https://github.com/Netflix

This is all real code they built for their own use and released, so it should be a good indicator of what real code look like. Even better would be for you to contribute to open source; then you can pick up real tasks and execute them, plus you can include your github profile on your CV. I saw a CV last week from someone who was a contributor to Mockito which I found very impressive.



Thanks for the response. I've had a github account for a while and have been browsing some open source projects but its a bit hard to use them to help me gauge where I'm at. I can do coding problems in textbooks comfortably, and can do coding problems on sites like codeEval and codingBat comfortably, but for a lot of the big open source projects there's a ton of technologies I have never heard of. Its hard to tell what can be learned and contributed to in a reasonable amount of time, and what I should basically just forget about because I'm way out of my league. I certainly want to contribute to open source projects and at the moment have the free time to do so, it just seems like what I need now is a good strategy to pick the right one.
 
Jayesh A Lalwani
Rancher
Posts: 2759
32
Eclipse IDE Spring Tomcat Server
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Start slow. Don't start with Netflix. If you are just learning how to make buildings, and you want to understand how the Empire State Building was built, you don't start by going over the plans of the Empire State Building. You start by learning how to lay a foundation.

Start with Apache commons. They are reusable convenience classes that are built on top of Java.
 
arulk pillai
Author
Posts: 3473
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
start with self-taught projects to understand the big picture before looking at open-source.
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic