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Storm Applied book question

 
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Hello and welcome to the ranch

It's first time that i hear about storm. Is your book good way to start with storm? Are you using java in your examples only, or scala also ?
I am new to big data, working as java EE developer. I want to start with big data but feel kind of lost :P There is also spark and hadoop, i have read your previous answers and now i see the differences, but not sure what would be a good way to start with big data and tools. Can you give me some advices ? I would really appreciate that.
It seems like there is so much need for big data developers with java/scala knowledge(not talking about data scientists), just thinking what would be the best way to get to that areas. I know that there is so much to learn new things but i like to learn. Just wondering how to get started.
 
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We wrote the book to try to take people from having 0 knowledge about Storm to being able to run a production cluster. It won't tell you everything you need to know but we think it is an excellent guide to get you there.
There's an awful lot there that I wish someone had been around to teach me rather than having to painfully figure out myself. We even through in some distributed systems advice for good measure.

All the code in the book is in Java. We wanted the examples to reach the widest audience (we use Scala ourselves outside of the context of the book).

To get started, just start. Pick something that looks interesting, Storm, Hadoop, Spark, Samza and start playing around with it. Get comfortable then find someplace you can put it into practical use running in a production environment.
 
Krystian Kowalski
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Thank you for your answer, that book seems to be great for me Ye i think you are right, just get solid basics and find a work where i can use it more seriously.
I am just wondering how do you like scala? I have heard good things about scala so much, it's getting more popular and used in production enviroment. It's not that mature like java ofc
Also, I'm going to look into scala but maybe not for now, because still there are some things that i want to learn from java.
 
Sean Allen
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Scala is my preferred language for doing serious work on JVM. That said, I'm not a giant fan of the language. It has an awful lot of warts and wtfs, but I find it to be the most productive JVM language for me.
 
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