Win a copy of Five Lines of Code this week in the OO, Patterns, UML and Refactoring forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Ron McLeod
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • fred rosenberger
  • salvin francis
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
  • Carey Brown

Find a folder

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1402
3
Netbeans IDE Spring Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,

I am running Jenkins in my local, I need to go here and I cant find it in my Mac like this: I get this:

I need to reach that folder when following this tutorial:


Is it time to build yet?
Yes. Yes it is. In the left sidebar of Jenkins click the Build Now link. It will eventually fail because it's trying to download too many packages from GitHub while being unauthenticated. We can fix this by changing into the job directory, cd /var/lib/jenkins/jobs/your-project-name and manually running Composer with composer update. After a few successful package downloads, you will be prompted to enter your GitHub credentials. When you do, the packages will continue to be downloaded.



Any idea, please?

Regards, Isaac


 
Marshal
Posts: 69752
277
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

campbell@campbellsComputer:~$ find /dev/fd/3
/dev/fd/3

Let's see what I can find in my O'Reilly book Linux in a Nutshell (Siever Figgins Love and Robbins) page 139
It says find takes pathname followed by tags for the conditions, defaulting to starting from the current directory. If you start a pathname with / it obviously goes to the filesystem root, otherwise it assumes your path starts from the current directory. So when I went to ~, this:-
find java/ -name Char*.java
gave me quite a lot of files with names beginning Char.
I suggest you try
cd /var/lib
ls j*

to see whether the jenkins folder is there at all. I haven't got one myself, but I am not using Jenkins.
find /home/ -name Char*Printer.java -type f
works for me, finding about 6 kind sof CharacterPrinter files.
 
Marshal
Posts: 3144
466
Android Eclipse IDE TypeScript Redhat MicroProfile Quarkus Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
/dev/fd/x are the file descriptors for your process (0=stdio, 1=stdout, 2=stderr). I don't know how find works internally, but my guess would be that during one phase it might have built a list of file nodes that required creating a pipe or something resulting dev/fd/3, and in a subsequent phase it when going through the list, /dev/fd/3 didn't exist anymore.

If you don't want to see these and possiblly othher messages such as Permission denied, either do as Campbell suggested and start somewhere other that the top of the file system, or redirect the error mesages off some place where you won't see them such as: find / -name jenkins -type d 2> /dev/null.
 
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 22248
151
Android Eclipse IDE Tomcat Server Redhat Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you have it installed, the "locate" command is often better for that kind of stuff. It builds a database that can be quickly searched and it doesn't include the "files" that aren't data, such as the /dev device files and the /proc data.

Conventionally, though, the popular places to put applications are under /opt or /usr/local. For data such as workspaces, also check under /var/lib.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 789
Python C++ Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Isaac Ferguson wrote:Hi,
I am running Jenkins in my local, I need to go here



That is a valid command.
Try cd /var and if it accepts that type ls and see if the next subdirectory you need exists, then cd to that directory. Eventualy you'll find the one that doesn't exist. Use sudo mkdir and sudo rmdir to make or remove subdirectories in var.
 
Did you miss me? Did you miss this tiny ad?
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic