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Should I switch from NetBeans to JDeveloper?

 
Bartender
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Netbeans IDE C++ Java Windows
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I know this kind of question provokes religious debates, but maybe that's not always a bad thing. I have been happily using NetBeans for several years. However, I've just started using UML class diagrams and want to have an editor that can keep my code and my diagrams in step with each other. NetBeans used to have a plug-in for that, but not anymore (since version 6.7). Somewhat surprisingly, their own site recommends JDeveloper as a UML tool. Well, as it happens, JDeveloper is a full-blown IDE, not just an editor for UML diagrams. I like NetBeans, but I'm not married to it. And I don't like the idea of shuffling files into and out of one IDE just so I can use an editor that doesn't exist in another IDE.

So, should I switch from NetBeans to JDeveloper?

Perhaps a better question might be this: What will I miss about about NetBeans if I switch to JDeveloper?

I use Subversion for my version control. It plays well with NetBeans. I wouldn't want to lose that. The GUI editor appears to be the same (maybe they are both using Matisse?). My sole motivation for considering this switch is that JDeveloper has a good UML editor that links the class diagrams to the code. Is there a better option that keeps me using NetBeans?

All advice gratefully accepted.
 
Rancher
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I have never used NetBeans. But, JDeveloper is awful. I could never check in code properly through JDeveloper, and it doesn't have decent Maven integration, nor does it allow you to write plugins yourself.

The reason why Netbeans tells you to go to JDeveloper is because NetBeans is the IDE that Sun made, JDeveloper is the IDE that Oracle made. Oracle bought Sun, and it has to maintain Netbeans now. It doesn't want to maintain 2 IDEs. It wants people to use JDeveloper.
 
Stevens Miller
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Jayesh A Lalwani wrote:I have never used NetBeans. But, JDeveloper is awful.



What do you use, Jayesh?
 
Jayesh A Lalwani
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I use Eclipse, but I don;t think Eclipse has what you want. Or it might have. You might want to look at the plugins
 
But how did the elephant get like that? What did you do? I think all we can do now is read this tiny ad:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
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