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Java / Tomcat Web Hosting Recommendations?

 
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Hi,

I've been with the same web hosting provider now for about 13 years and they've been pretty good. I have a "VPS" where I can host as many client Web sites (Java Web sites, REST/JAX-WS Web Services, Drupal, WordPress, etc.) as I want. Email server and other features also a given. cPanel access, webmail, FTP, and just about everything else I could hope for is there. 125 GB server space, 4 GB RAM. All for about $850/yr.

However, now I understand that "CentOS 7", the new Linux distribution, won't support Tomcat via cPanel at all. Thus, 'Install Servlets" and other simple Tomcat/Apache integration I've come to expect simply will be ... gone. At least at is stands now.

While I'm fine configuring Tomcat on a local machine, messing around with Tomcat and Apache together is time consuming.

Therefore, I wanted to ask for recommendations for web hosting companies who don't use CentOS 7, and have EXCELLENT Tomcat integration with Java on their servers. Naturally, I need features similar to my introductory paragraph above.

Tomcat is integral to my business.

I don't mind simple server administration, but I don't have time, patience, or inclination to become a Unix Guru.

Thanks in advance,

-mike
 
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Amazon provide a service called EC2, check it out! My company uses it for example to deploy various java servers running Jetty and possibly Tomcat.
 
Mike London
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P Marksson wrote:Amazon provide a service called EC2, check it out! My company uses it for example to deploy various java servers running Jetty and possibly Tomcat.



Thanks for your reply.

My issue is that I have multiple domains I host and am used to being able set up DNS simply via the WHM console that Linux hosting companies offer.

Plus, being able to simply deploy a web app is easy on the Linux host. Although it used to be a pain, currently, it's quite simple.

Would I expect the same level of ease of use on Amazon EC2 or would I be more or less on my own configuration wise?

Thanks for your next reply.

- mike
 
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There's also Red Hat OpenShift / Origin PaaS. I've been working on an internally hosted implementation at work and while there's a bit of a learning curve, once you get the project set up on the cloud (an automated self-service process), all you have to do is git clone the project to your local environment. The dev cycle then becomes make changes, then git commit and git push to deploy. This triggers an automatic build/deploy (Jenkins) and then your app changes are up and running on the cloud. The whole build/deploy/restart cycle is about a minute or so, often less. You get a default skeleton Maven project to start with when a project on Origin gets created. I kind of like it because of the prebuilt deployment pipeline to production. It's a nice entry point to DevOps. The choices for Tomcat are 6 or 7, using either the jbossews-1.0 or jbossews-2.0 cartridge, respectively.
 
Greenhorn
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Looks like no actual suggestion has been made here so far apart from using a VPS or Origin. However, it sounds to me like Mike is looking for a replacement for cPanel hosting with Tomcat. I've been using JavaPipe's Tomcat hosting for years for smaller projects and they are amazing in what they offer. What you get is similar to cPanel, just that they use the SiteWorx control panel from where you can start/stop the container. It's also private Tomcat installations, not shared ones, which enabled me to run Hibernate which some of my projects use.

Of course managing your own VPS is an alternative as well, but I personally find it more convenient to let the hosting provider manage the servers and only focus on running my app.
 
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I've been using DailyRazor for some years now; they have cPanel-based Java hosting like you describe.
 
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