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Design for the mind: a universal pattern of UX design?

 
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Considering of all the principles of UX design, will there be a universal pattern that meets all the demands of principles and thus facilitate design people?
 
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vladimir zhang wrote:Considering of all the principles of UX design, will there be a universal pattern that meets all the demands of principles and thus facilitate design people?


What, one? I seriously doubt it. I suspect there are all sorts of useful patterns and "best practises" though - however, not being an expert, I couldn't tell you what they are.

I suspect there are books on the subject though.

Winston
 
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I suspect there will be a universal pattern just as soon as we've managed to ensure all people are identical :-).
 
vladimir zhang
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One pattern may be extreme. But is it possible to generate several patterns, in order to facilitate life, that when we want to design something, we can simply use it without much thinking, and it's quite appreciable by people?
 
Winston Gutkowski
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vladimir zhang wrote:But is it possible to generate several patterns, in order to facilitate life, that when we want to design something


Sure. And as I said, there are plenty of books on the subject - of which this one is probably the best known.

But specifically for UX design? I don't know if there are any, but I suspect there are.

we can simply use it without much thinking


That takes reading, time, and lots of practise.

Winston
 
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Great question. I don't think there would be one pattern or set of patterns that can be applied to any situation. But that's why we need good designers who are well versed in how people think and behave. Some of what I discuss in Design for the Mind is that learning the principles of psychology can help you understand the underlying factors that lead to people using a product. Knowing these principles can then help you come up with workflows and design elements that facilitate ease of use. However, when we deal with humans, there will always be challenges and unknowns.

Personally, I think that's part of the beauty of design. The challenge of creating something that people will find useful and useable. One of the best ways to keep moving in this direction is through user research. Getting feedback on your design throughout the design process is critical to ending up with a good product. I think psychology and user research are powerful tools to help inform your design.

Victor
 
Winston Gutkowski
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Victor Yocco wrote:However, when we deal with humans, there will always be challenges and unknowns.


Very true. In the past, it usually boiled down to people not reading the instructions they were given; but in this new world of smartphones and touch-screen "gestures", I suspect it has much more to do with "being intuitive" - or, as I call it, 'POLA²'.

And I hate to say, but as an old "structured" blowhard, I often find myself wishing for a command line when faced with a smartphone app that won't "do what I want it to".

Winston
 
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