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Compare and Contrast

 
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That is the sort of question they used to ask in exams when I was at school. Let's set a new one:-

Compare and Contrast the Jeremy Kubica style and the Head First Style.

Head First books were written to be memorable. I presume you have had a similar inspiration. How does your style differ from the Head First style?
 
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I was wondering the same kind of thing, except I was wondering how the style of this book compares to that of books like Goldratt's The Goal and Kim's The Phoenix Project. Was this book meant to be a more approachable version of Knuth?
 
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Junilu Lacar wrote:. . . a more approachable version of Knuth?

Surely no book can be more approachable than Knuth.
 
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I have to admit that I haven't read any of the head first books, so I can't really compare the styles with that series.

As for Knuth, Introduction to Algorithms by Leiserson, Stein, Rivest, and Cormen (the book I used in when taking intro algorithms), or any of the other really great algorithms books out there, The CS Detective is obviously meant to be a lot less formal.  Instead of trying to be another formal algorithms book, I'm hoping it will supplement them, such as: getting inexperienced people interested and excited about algorithms, providing a high level overview before someone dives into the technical material, providing novel non-computer science (and often absurd) examples for someone learning the algorithms, and providing amusing refresher examples for people with experience.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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