• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Ron McLeod
  • Paul Clapham
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Junilu Lacar
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Tim Cooke
  • Henry Wong
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • salvin francis
  • Frits Walraven
Bartenders:
  • Scott Selikoff
  • Piet Souris
  • Carey Brown

Kubernetes Management Design Patterns - Questions

 
Author
Posts: 16
5
Spring VI Editor Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Deepak

Here are my questions

1) At the moment there are several "distributions" of Kubernetes and I see that your book covers already a lot of them (Openshift, GCE, Tectonic). At the moment Kubernetes is fairly new and it is easy to move applications from
one vendor to the next. As time progresses, I have a fear that companies will add their own incompatible "extensions" to their K8s distributions in order to lock-in customers and not allow them to move freely between competitors.

What is your view on this? Do you see this happening in the future?

2) There is a great deal of documentation on K8s vs Docker swarm and K8s vs Mesos. However there is very little information on K8s vs Hashicorp Nomad. Any thoughts on this?

3) I don't see any chapter that deals with K8s Security. Do you cover this in your book? What should I do if I want to run a PCI compliant application on K8s today? How can I approach this problem?

Thanks

Kostis
 
Author
Posts: 64
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
1) At the moment there are several "distributions" of Kubernetes and I see that your book covers already a lot of them (Openshift, GCE, Tectonic). At the moment Kubernetes is fairly new and it is easy to move applications from one vendor to the next. As time progresses, I have a fear that companies will add their own incompatible "extensions" to their K8s distributions in order to lock-in customers and not allow them to move freely between competitors.

What is your view on this? Do you see this happening in the future?

Several proprietory distributions of container cluster managers  are being used and those are not available for general use. The Kubernetes container cluster manager was also a proprietary container cluster manager and has been used for 15 years in production at Google and only recently open-sourced. Kubernetes is the most widely used container cluster manager. OpenShift is based on Kubernetes and provides some additional features. GCE is a cloud platform and the Kubernetes on GCE is not any different than the distribution that may be downloaded and installed. Tectonic is a managed service for Kubernetes. What is likely is that different cloud platforms or vendors would provide Kubernetes as a managed service. IBM Bluemix already provides Kubernetes as a managed service.

2) There is a great deal of documentation on K8s vs Docker swarm and K8s vs Mesos. However there is very little information on K8s vs Hashicorp Nomad. Any thoughts on this?


More commonly a framework is used more the documentation on it would be available. Hashicorp Nomad is relatively not as commonly used as Docker Swarm and Mesos.


3) I don't see any chapter that deals with K8s Security. Do you cover this in your book? What should I do if I want to run a PCI compliant application on K8s today? How can I approach this problem?


For PCI compliance some proprietary solution would have to be used as Kubernetes does not provide built-in PCI compliance.
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Deepak,

I am glad to see more cover on k8s. In that aspect, does the book cover deployment/management in enterprise environments which are not, but are intending to be, on multi/private clouds?
 
Deepak Vohra
Author
Posts: 64
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Even enterprises prefer the cloud platforms such as AWS and Google Cloud Platform. The book discusses AWS and Google Cloud Platform. Tectonic provides "self-driving" Kubernetes to the enterprise. Tectonic is also discussed in the book. OpenShift provides one of the leading Enterprise Kubernetes platforms and OpenShift is discussed in the book. Regarding "enterprise environments  intending to be on multi/private clouds" AWS provides Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs).
 
Arthur, where are your pants? Check under this tiny ad.
Thread Boost feature
https://coderanch.com/t/674455/Thread-Boost-feature
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic