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Spring Microservices in Action: Spring technologies for microservices explained separately?

 
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Hi John,

I just checked the Table of Contents of the book on Amazon and saw there many technologies used together and to many if not all of them (expect Spring Boot) I'm very beginner!
So, does this book fits to guys who know some Spring Core/Spring Boot but are new to microservices architecture ?

Thanks


P.S. Congrats for the book!
 
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Hi Durim,

I think this book might be your sweet spot for a number of different reasons:

1.  I targeted the books specifically to Spring developers.  You need to have a basic understanding of Spring, but you by no means have to be an Spring Expert to understand the book.

2.  I wrote the book from an engineering perspective.  I have played both the role of engineer and architect in my career.  When I wrote this book, I wanted to provide a hands-on, consumable and self-contained book that developers could use in their day to day jobs.   Personally, I try to write the books I like to read.  In this case, the book is heavy on code-examples and light on architectural discussions.  There are lots of good "pure" architecture books on there (Sam Neuman's Book (Oreilly) and Chris Richardson Microservices Patterns in Action book (Manning Press)) are two books that come to mind.  They are both really good books, but focus on the design side of things.  I have always been of the opinion that most developers can get their feet underneath them with a few good code examples.

3.  Writing individual microservices is easy, operationalizing them is a whole another story.  Thats why I the books focuses on all of the technologies that are needed to support a microservices-based application.  That is frankly where I saw the sweet spot for this book when I began writing it.   I have one basic chapter on microservice design and the rest of the chapters all the other technologies you will need sooner or later as you go down your microservice journey.

4.  As for the number of technologies in the book, I would not be too intimidated by it.  I tried to write each chapter to be standalone because frankly everyone who is building the microservices applications have a different environment they are working in.  I really wanted the book to be a book you could read end-to-end or just pick and choose the chapters you are interested in.  

I hope that answered your question.

   Thanks,
       John
 
Durim Kryeziu
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John Carnell wrote:Hi Durim,

I think this book might be your sweet spot for a number of different reasons:

1.  I targeted the books specifically to Spring developers.  You need to have a basic understanding of Spring, but you by no means have to be an Spring Expert to understand the book.

2.  I wrote the book from an engineering perspective.  I have played both the role of engineer and architect in my career.  When I wrote this book, I wanted to provide a hands-on, consumable and self-contained book that developers could use in their day to day jobs.   Personally, I try to write the books I like to read.  In this case, the book is heavy on code-examples and light on architectural discussions.  There are lots of good "pure" architecture books on there (Sam Neuman's Book (Oreilly) and Chris Richardson Microservices Patterns in Action book (Manning Press)) are two books that come to mind.  They are both really good books, but focus on the design side of things.  I have always been of the opinion that most developers can get their feet underneath them with a few good code examples.

3.  Writing individual microservices is easy, operationalizing them is a whole another story.  Thats why I the books focuses on all of the technologies that are needed to support a microservices-based application.  That is frankly where I saw the sweet spot for this book when I began writing it.   I have one basic chapter on microservice design and the rest of the chapters all the other technologies you will need sooner or later as you go down your microservice journey.

4.  As for the number of technologies in the book, I would not be too intimidated by it.  I tried to write each chapter to be standalone because frankly everyone who is building the microservices applications have a different environment they are working in.  I really wanted the book to be a book you could read end-to-end or just pick and choose the chapters you are interested in.  

I hope that answered your question.

   Thanks,
       John



Yes! Thanks for such a good answer
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