Win a copy of Five Lines of Code this week in the OO, Patterns, UML and Refactoring forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Ron McLeod
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • fred rosenberger
  • salvin francis
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
  • Carey Brown

Spring Microservices in Action: Sample GitHub Code and Docker container

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 237
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Hi John,

Welcome to the forum, and best wishes with the Spring Microservices in Action book.

In going through GitHub source code it does look Docker is mandated. Now how much of a learning is curve is that, and is there cheat sheet to that effect in the appendix  section? For a typical work laptop how much of a drag it is to install and run this locally (in addition of the bunch of other mandatory running services, not to mention the bunch of libraries that we'd need to keep going - Eureka, Zuul, and so on)?

Alternately, are the exercises meant to be practiced and run exclusively in a dev or remote box?

Thanks,
SB
 
Author
Posts: 93
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Saket,  

Thank you for the kind words.  You can build and run the services without Docker.  However, you have to manually start each service and also make sure you have a Postgres database running.  That being said, I tried to build all of the chapters so you could start all of the services without having  to do all of the I just described.  Thats why I used Docker and Docker Compose so that all of the services could be started locally.  You can run these exercises on a Dev box.  All of the instructions you need to build and run the code material in the Chapter can be found in the Appendix and the READMEs in each individual Chapter.

If you are space constrained on your work laptop, I would recommend you get a Amazon AWS account.  When I was writing the book, I used the 1 year free tier to pretty much run all of the infrastructure.  I know that adds even more complexity if you are beginning.  An alternative is to run some of the services like Postegres, Kafka and Redis on a Dev server and then run and test your services locally.  Frankly, that is one of the downsides of a microservice architecture is that if you do want to run the app locally you end up running dozens of containers.  What we do in my company is we make heavy use of unit and integration tests with mocks to build and test services locally.  As long as you know what your remote service calls are going to return, its usually pretty easy to mock out services using mock-server.

I hope I answered your question.

   Thanks,
       John
 
Saket Barve
Ranch Hand
Posts: 237
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you John, for the clarification and detailed response .

For me, this translates into leveraging PCF (which is where we, as an org, are headed for now).
 
Your mother is a hamster and your father smells of tiny ads!
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic