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OCA Fundamentals

 
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hi Hadumant,

a slight disadvantage of the OCA book from Boyarski and Selikoff is that some chapters are very long (over 60 pages) so that you have to learn quite a lot and taking you much time before you can start with the exercises.  I could not find a content list of your book, therefore my question how is that in your book?
 
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I found a similar imbalance of chapter lengths with the Sierra Bates and Robson book.
 
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I have to concur with Piet and Campbell. I have Java version 5 and 6 of the Sierra/Bates books. For the most part, I can't say enough about them, and even though we're now looking at version 10 of Java I still refer back to those books. However, lengthy chapters can be cumbersome to go through. I found with some chapters I would need to break it down into smaller chunks, by reading only to a certain point, then reviewing and studying what I learned, doing the coding exercises and then going to the test questions that dealt with that specific chunk of material. So my question to you Hadumant would be similar to Piet's question.

Thank you!
 
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This book is structured to match the exam objectives very closely. Since some objectives require more pages than others, the chapter lengths are different. But there are exercises interspersed within the chapters, so you can pause at the end of a sub-topic.



 
Hanumant Deshmukh Ii
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BTW, you should be able to see the detailed TOC on Amazon now.
 
Randy Maddocks
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Thank you for your response Hanumant (please also accept my apology for spelling your name wrong!). And congratulations on your book!
 
Piet Souris
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Yes, thank you for the answer. Using questions to break up a long chapter is an excellent compromis.

And me too, I must apologize for getting your name wrong, somehow. Don't understnd how that could have happened, for I checked and rechecked. Probably the old age...
 
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Randy Maddocks wrote:Thank you for your response Hanumant (please also accept my apology for spelling your name wrong!). And congratulations on your book!



Piet Souris wrote:
And me too, I must apologize for getting your name wrong, somehow. Don't understnd how that could have happened, for I checked and rechecked. Probably the old age...



That's alight. No worries
 
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