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How important is memorization in web development?

 
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Hey there, everyone. I REALLY hope I am posting in the right place but here goes... I have ONLY been learning Web Development for under a week. After seeing everything I'm exposed to , regarding HTML and CSS in the Web Development course I'm currently taking, it made a question pop into my head. How much "stuff" regarding Web Development does a professional Dev need to know? For example, I've spoken with some Web Developers who told me that more important than memorizing tags is knowing how they work and how to find what I am looking for, in regards to roadblocks I may come across, in my programming. Basically, what I am asking is what I need to be able to pull out my memory and what is okay to use references for? I know I may sound weird but I'm just worried that if I can't memorize massive amounts of stuff, that I'll be a terrible Web Developer. If I posted this in the wrong section, I'm sorry , as I'm still learning to navigate the site. Thanks in advance.
 
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Albert Einstein once said, "I never memorise anything I can look up."  That's even more true in the internet age.

But in reality, you will find yourself remembering the things that are important to you and your code.
 
Michael McCoy
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Knute Snortum wrote:Albert Einstein once said, "I never memorise anything I can look up."  That's even more true in the internet age.

But in reality, you will find yourself remembering the things that are important to you and your code.



That was extremely helpful and encouraging. I suppose I'm overthinking it, since I'm so new to the whole deal. Thank you for your advice.
 
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The only time I knew all the statements et cetera by head, was the moment I passed my Java certification. They have been paying me for more than twenty year, so I would not worry too much.

Oh yeah, I am still proud of it, passed my SCJP with 82% score!

:-) :-)


(But it was ~15 years ago I think.)
 
Michael McCoy
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Jan de Boer wrote:The only time I knew all the statements et cetera by head, was the moment I passed my Java certification. They have been paying me for more than twenty year, so I would not worry too much.

Oh yeah, I am still proud of it, passed my SCJP with 82% score!

:-) :-)


(But it was ~15 years ago I think.)




Wow! Good on you! I guess I'll gain confidence with time.
 
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You learn the stuff you use a lot. For example, think about how to count from 1 to 10 and print the results. When you were brand new to programming, this required looking stuff up. By now, this should be easy in your primary language.
 
Michael McCoy
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:You learn the stuff you use a lot. For example, think about how to count from 1 to 10 and print the results. When you were brand new to programming, this required looking stuff up. By now, this should be easy in your primary language.


Well-put. Thank you .
 
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Just as with a natural language, you have an active and a passive vocabulary with a development language. That active vocabulary is a collection of keywords which you use daily, and understand fluently. The passive vocabulary is a set of keywords which you recognize, but may not think of immediately.

For HTML, you should have an active vocabulary of about 20 - 30 elements. Look over web pages on just about any web site (including Quora) and you'll find the same 30ish HTML elements; <body>, <div>, <p>, <ul>, etc. These you should know well.

Your active vocabulary are those HTML tags that you've read about - from a book or a blog. It's ok that you don't know the half-a-dozen different elements that exist for a <table>. but if you see a <colgroup>, it should seem familiar to you.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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