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Marshal
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. . . great chieftain o' the puddin' race.

And I found an article about ultrasound used for investigating its reproductive behaviour. King, Cromarty, Paterson and Boyd, Veterinary Record (2007) 160: 94‑96
 
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A. M. King et al. wrote:It has adapted uniquely to the inhospitable terrain in which it
lives, in that its left ipsilateral pair of legs (membra thoracici
et pelvine sinistra) are considerably longer than its right ipsilateral
pair (membra thoracici et pelvine dextra), allowing it
to graze along the steep mountain slopes towards the rising
sun and move through the heather.



So it's a member of the Sidehill gouger family, which is mostly limited to North America. But apparently the wild haggis is unusual in that only the sinistra maxima variety is present.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Paul Clapham wrote:. . . So it's a member of the Sidehill gouger family, which is mostly limited to North America. . . . .

No, it's parallel evolution; the Welsh mountain sheep which is in a totally different family also has leg asymmetry. And that is the reason why wild haggises are so rare; if you chase them the “wrong way” round the hill, they overbalance very readily and are easily caught. You can tell they were the farmed variety in that article; they have been provided with a shiny skin, whereas the one we ate yesterday had a more natural‑looking skin.
 
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Oh ok, last night was Burn's night - celebrating the poet Robert Burns with whiskey (yum) and Haggis (yuk).  
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Disaster struck: I pulled the top of the whisky bottle and had half a cork in my hand.
Rather than dipping the haggis into boiling water, Ruth tried a different technique, as shown on its wrapper: wrap the animal in foil to keep al water out, dip it in a dish full of water as a bain‑Marie, and give it about 1¼ hours in the oven. Much better flavour 
 
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Two reasons I'm grateful my Scots ancestors migrated to the New World:

1. It's feckin' cold in Scotland and I'm a warm-weather person (although they weren't, since they first moved to upstate New York, which is practically Scotland itself).

2. Haggis.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Upstate NY is  d*mn sight colder in winter than Scotland. Another thing you would have missed, though it varies with latitude, is the day length. When I worked near Glasgow, it didn't get light until 10.00 in December if the weather was overcast, and it was getting dark by 3.00. It wasn't as bad if there was a clear sky. Of course in Summer, things are the other way round.  Even where I am (54° 34′) it never gets properly dark in June.
 
Tim Holloway
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I can't vouch for temperatures - except for August. When I visited up there, they didn't think 45°F/5°C was cold enough to turn on the heat. Lake Effect snow isn't a big thing in Scotland that I know of, though. A  general rule for Europe is add 10° extra latitude to get the North American equivalent in effective climate. Much of England was clear of snow cover the other day and you couldn't say that of its latitudinal equivalents over here.

My mother said she used to hate being pushed off to bed when the sun was still up at 10:00PM up in Syracuse.

I don't see much difference in daylight over seasons down here at 30°N. One reason we're about ready to get rid of Summer time clocks in Florida. In the land of my birth, there are 2 longest days of the year. At 9°N, the sun actually is lower in the sky at the Summer solstice than in days around it.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Tim Holloway wrote:. . . the sun was still up at 10:00PM up in Syracuse. . . .

Mudst be at the western edge of a time‑zone. If I go to Flanders or Holland in summer, I am surprised by how late the sun seems to set; It is maybe earlier than I am used to at 54°, but the clocks are set an hour fast.I don't know what it would be like at La Coruña, but that is west of almost all of Britain and one timezone east of here.
 
Tim Holloway
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No, it's in the middle. Allow for Daylight Savings and youthful exaggeration, i think. According to a quick check, though full night in Syracuse at the Summer Solstice is at 11:06 PM, and I don't know if that's EST or EDT.

Florida, incidentally, should be almost or entirely in the Central Time Zone, if you went strictly by longitude. In fact, only the extreme western Panhandle (where last year's hurricane swept through) is in Central Time. The bulk of the state is Eastern time for historical reasons - trains came down the East Coast from New York full of snowbirds and it saved them from having to adjust their watches. Of course, it was railroads that started the whole time zone thing to begin with!
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Tim Holloway wrote:. . . Allow for Daylight Savings and youthful exaggeration . . . full night in Syracuse at the Summer Solstice is at 11:06 PM . . .

I would say youthful exaggeration; I used to get annoyed about going to bed at 7.00, but I think I was smaller then.

We don't get full night between about 31st May and 10th July.

it was railroads that started the whole time zone thing to begin with!

It was the railways that even brought the minute into common use.
 
Tim Holloway
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:It was the railways that even brought the minute into common use.



And then British Rail laughed.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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British Rail were a lot better at punctuality than most people think.
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