This week's book giveaway is in the Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning forum.
We're giving away four copies of Machine Learning with R: Expert techniques for predictive modeling and have Brett Lantz on-line!
See this thread for details.
Win a copy of Machine Learning with R: Expert techniques for predictive modeling this week in the Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Bear Bibeault
Sheriffs:
  • Knute Snortum
  • Tim Cooke
  • Devaka Cooray
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Moores
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
  • Ganesh Patekar

Which IDE should I use to help me learn?

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know this question will be a pain point for many people, but with the transition of Netbeans over to Apache from Oracle my favorite code editor is in flux. Combine that with the license concerns surrounding Java Is like to know which IDE is most compatible and complimentary to learning Java 11.

Many thanks and welcome to CodeRanch.

Brad
 
Marshal
Posts: 65827
250
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Brad Jennings wrote:. . . which IDE is most compatible and complimentary to learning Java 11. . . .

All of them.

Do you ever get questions about setting the CLASSPATH or similar? If so, you may find a plain simple text editor helpful because you are using the command line/terminal to set the CLASSPATH, and an IDE would hide that useful information from you.
 
Bartender
Posts: 1042
19
Mac OS X IntelliJ IDE Oracle Spring VI Editor Tomcat Server Redhat Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
BlueJ is a nice editor to learn the basics of Java for beginners.   Otherwise it's really down to personal preference [I'm often still using vi ;-) ].  

I don't share your concerns over NetBeans being taken on by the Apache Foundation as they have a long history in open source.  For example the Apache httpd server ('A PAtCHy' server) is ridiculously popular.      
 
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 21137
134
Android Eclipse IDE Tomcat Server Redhat Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Our standard answer is: "Windows Notepad".

Netbeans may be just now going open-source, but Eclipse has been open-source since somewhere around the year 2000, and it certainly hasn't hurt it.

In fact, the MariaDB DBMS and LibreOffice open-source projects exist precisely because people didn't like Oracle's ownership of MySQL and OpenOffice. OpenOffice was eventually also donated to Apache, but the damage was done, so LibreOffice is now the favored alternative - it comes standard with the Red Hat/Fedora distros, for example.

Apache, incidentally, also provides the industry-standard Tomcat web application server and a lot of shops use that in place of or in addition to the heavy-duty commercial servers like WebSphere and WebLogic. Or JBoss/Wildfly which is open-source, owned by Red Hat.

The problem with using an IDE instead of a simple text editor like Notepad is that IDEs are too helpful. When they do work for you, you don't learn how to do the work yourself and you don't learn why the work is being done.

The equivalent of Windows NotePad on Linux is gnote if you're running a gnome desktop, or its KDE equivalent, which I think is called knote, but whatever.

On a strictly command-line level for the Linux/Unix OS's, there's vi and Emacs, which are religion-level editors, but vi is dangerous if you sneeze with your fingers over the keyboard and Emacs has often been accused of being an entire operating system masquerading as a text editor. In fact, Emacs itself has a Java IDE plugin, although the fully-GUI IDEs are a lot more capable.

Actually, for Linux, these days the recommended editor for basic/beginner use from the command line is nano.
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 65827
250
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would use a posher text editor that MS NotePad; I like NotePad++ (not at all related to MS NotePad) on Windows®, and gedit/pluma or kate on Linux.
 
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 21137
134
Android Eclipse IDE Tomcat Server Redhat Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I stand corrected. gnote is a Post-It[TM] note program that allows you to display "sticky notes" on-screen and hyperlink them. I was in fact thinking of gedit.
 
Can you really tell me that we aren't dealing with suspicious baked goods? And then there is this tiny ad:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!