Win a copy of Terraform in Action this week in the Cloud forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Paul Clapham
  • Ron McLeod
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Rob Spoor
  • Bear Bibeault
Saloon Keepers:
  • Jesse Silverman
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Al Hobbs
  • salvin francis

Some Kotlin questions for Ken Kousen

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 161
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi. My two main questions are:

1.) Kotlin is a functional language, as is Scala, and both run on the JVM. Java also has the ability for functional programming, although not originally designed that way as were Kotlin and Scala. What situations would dictate the use of Kotlin over Scala and/or Java?
    Why would I want to put the time into learning Kotlin, convincing bosses/co-workers of its superiority over Java/Scala, etc?
2.) Followup to the last part of #1, what arguments should I use to convince said bosses/co-workers?

Thanks!
 
gunslinger & author
Posts: 158
11
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kotlin borrows a lot of ideas from other languages, like companion objects from Scala and closures from Groovy. If you're an Android developer, using Kotlin is a no-brainer. For the regular JVM, I think you can go either way. I like the Kotlin language and community, which tends to be very friendly and welcoming to newcomers.

Kotlin simplifies Java in many respects, and the null-safety is very appealing to existing Java developers. The coroutines in Kotlin are also a good reason to use the language. Java since 1.8 has gotten much better though, so I don't think the gap is as big as it used to be. I like Kotlin and it's fun to use, but it's still young, with the issues that go along with that.

The biggest features that are used to sell Kotlin to the larger community are its null safety and the coroutines, which most people really like.
 
Lanny Gilbert
Ranch Hand
Posts: 161
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Null safety?? I know one manager who’d drop everything and send his team to Kotlin training just to get rid of the daily train of NPEs from the Java code in the app he manages. Thanks for the reply. Gotta try this out 😎
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic