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Is the (Java) world a lot smaller than I thought?

 
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I understand, in recent years, Python and C# have gained popularity and they are somewhat alternatives to Java.
Still, Java is in more than half of all coding jobs out there (well, in my area).
I estimate there may even be a MILLION java coders out there.

And yet... There are only a few, very small communities to discuss it?

I mean, don't get me wrong, I love everyone on this forum, who have spend SOOO much time trying to give me a hint.
But it feels like the active members are maybe 10-20 people. With occasional members joining just to get sorted on one issue, never to return again.

You'd think with so many users, this place would be almost impossible to cram a word in, sideways!

That being said, I do notice very few posts go unanswered, which is an epic accomplishment and I wished I could add in a good answer to someone, in the future!
 
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I think it's more like people have moved on from discussion forums to Q/A sites like StackOverflow. Java isn't an exciting new technology any more that everybody is trying to figure out and talk about, but a tool people use to get their work done.
 
Saloon Keeper
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Offhand, I don't know if C# is growing that much. A lot of work these days is done on non-Windows machines, and while technically you can run C# on other platforms (via Mono), very few people are brave enough to do so. And in fact, one popular sticky-note program (that I use daily) was forked to get it from C# to a less-proprietary platform.

Certainly Python is growing, but that's in no small part because Visual Basic is not available on non-Windows platforms. So for Unix-like OS's in particular, Python has become the VB-equivalent.

I know a lot of Java programmers in my town, but I don't think I've ever seen any of them here on the Ranch. In fact, the only person I know of in town who has popped up here never worked professionally in Java. For that matter, very few of them ever went to the local Java User Group meetings.
 
Todor Kolev
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On two occasions, I've been to a potential employer to interview for a C# job.
No idea how it slipped past my agent and the potential employer that my coding experience is mostly COBOL, some Java, no C#, .net or any MS programming.
Definitely a lot of C# in the UK.

My two best friends are both .net/C# guys (an Indian living in the UK and an Israeli living in Holland).

I think Azure definitely boosts C# a lot, because all sorts of DevOps stuff on Azure are automated with C# and DevOps is really hot right now.

Personally, I feel MS are going further and further away from what I like myself.

They have Windows going for them:
Windows XP had the most "user friendly" interface and Windows 7 solved XP being way too hackable
Plus, about 90% of the desktop software released will execute on those runtimes as a binary.

However, Windows 10 while really plugging the security holes to almost linux-like level, kinda ruined the interface (a destructive process that started with W8).
The runtime is still very inclusive but all those forced updates, forced telemetry and forced account-based access is a HUGE turn-off for me, as a user.

If linux could natively support applications compiled for the Windows runtime and their GUI had a more user-friendly front-end, sooner or later, they would
dominate Windows.
Mac is the most overrated linux distro out there. 10% of the applications I need are there and they are all "3/5 stars" apps that cost between 10-40 bucks...
I had a mac for two years (got duped by my boss) - more bugs than Ubuntu!
 
Tim Holloway
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I promised my wife that I would upgrade her Windows 7 system to Windows 10 as soon as they got it stable enough that it wouldn't wreck her computer after being updated. That was 6 months ago. I'm not convinced that Microsoft truly loves Windows anymore. I think that they're more on Office and The Cloud now.

C# is one of - probably THE premier language - for Windows desktop apps, but desktop apps are not the beginning and end of the world anymore. A lot of stuff is web-based now. And a lot of web servers are running Linux. And some desktop apps are running Java simply because you can use it both on Windows and on Unix and Linux OS's. I run a PCB design program that's in Java, for example. I also used to work with a great video editor written in Java.

That said, many shops have a sizeable Windows commitment, so Windows is what they employ for. Then again, many old-line shops have a sizeable mainframe (usually COBOL) commitment. But that's becoming more rare these days.
 
Todor Kolev
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Tim Holloway wrote: I run a PCB design program that's in Java, for example.



Nice!
One day, when I feel I could shift some time over from learning Java to learning something that I enjoy - I will pick up electronics.
I even have my workstation almost set up: Lots of components, neatly sorted into grids of small boxes, a huge bucket of unneeded appliances waiting to become a project.
All I need is: Scope, good quality iron and a wave generator - and time!
 
Tim Holloway
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I have an old WW2 surplus scope. It weighs a ton, runs on vacuum tubes. I haven't used it in years because it's too much trouble. Picked up a $20 LED-display pocket-sized scope recently and I like it a lot.

For years I used the cheap Weller 25W soldering irons, but these days the tips wear down to fat blobs after only about 15 hours of use and you cannot refile them. So I've pretty much given up on Weller. I got a solder rework station for under $100 that uses standard tips, including very fine-pointed ones for the really teeny connections and I like it a lot.

Don't have a signal generator, although I suppose I can program an Arduino if I need to.
 
Rancher
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There is very little action in the Java Forums any more, but then Java is a mature platform, despite Oracle's adoption of the MS feature release schedule, so pretty much anything you want to know is already on the web, other than "It doesn't work" type of questions.

I see jobs in my area mostly in SQL and then it runs the entire list of popular languages from A to Z.

I still get headhunters calling me for Java opportunities, they call for C# ones too, but I'll probably be staying where I am... the pay is good, the people are great, the benefits are good, and I can count my years left on 1 hand and a couple more fingers.
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