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Java Cookbook: Java and Kotlin

 
Greenhorn
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Hello Ian,

Which Java version would you recommend for deeper studying to Java 8 developer - 11 or 14?
What do you think about Kotlin position when Java 14 becomes more available (OpenJDK released)?
 
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My2 cents , if you are staring off from pre-Java 8 , you can jump on to any versions ,i would say
the higher the better it really doesn't matter.
 
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For learning, yes. For production environments you should stick with the latest LTS version (currently 11), unless you feel like upgrading every 6 months. Perhaps that can be made a bit easier by using jlink, because it allows you to bundle the development JDK with your application which can be deployed as one.
 
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Al Razor wrote:What do you think about Kotlin position when Java 14 becomes more available (OpenJDK released)?


Are you trying to imply that Kotlin would somehow become less relevant because of new features introduced in Java 14? Which specific features do you have in mind, if any?

I think that Kotlin will continue to evolve as more people use it. That path of evolution may be influenced by new additions and changes to the Java language and standard library but in my opinion, there's about as much pressure to change coming from Kotlin to Java, if not more. For example, Kotlin already supports multiline strings just as Groovy does whereas text blocks are still a preview mode feature in Java 14.
 
Al Razor
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Junilu Lacar wrote:

Al Razor wrote:What do you think about Kotlin position when Java 14 becomes more available (OpenJDK released)?


Are you trying to imply that Kotlin would somehow become less relevant because of new features introduced in Java 14? Which specific features do you have in mind, if any?

I think that Kotlin will continue to evolve as more people use it. That path of evolution may be influenced by new additions and changes to the Java language and standard library but in my opinion, there's about as much pressure to change coming from Kotlin to Java, if not more. For example, Kotlin already supports multiline strings just as Groovy does whereas text blocks are still a preview mode feature in Java 14.



The most important one would be records but there are other like improved switch, pattern matching for instanceof, text blocks that you mention, etc. Yes, most of the are still in the preview (or second preview) but they should be implemented sometime reasonably soon.

I think it will make Kotlin less desirable for Java teams to switch to (I am mostly talking about enterprise backend development).
 
Junilu Lacar
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I personally think that teams that have already moved from Java to Kotlin will stay in Kotlin until there's a compelling reason to switch back to Java. Maybe the same thing goes for teams that haven't made the switch to Kotlin yet (I mean that they'll stick with Java unless there's a compelling reason to go to Kotlin). I think teams that are doing Android development are more likely to make the switch to Kotlin though, since it has the backing from Google and the Android team. It's expressive and in many ways more enjoyable to code in than Java.
 
Al Razor
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Junilu Lacar wrote:I personally think that teams that have already moved from Java to Kotlin will stay in Kotlin until there's a compelling reason to switch back to Java. Maybe the same thing goes for teams that haven't made the switch to Kotlin yet (I mean that they'll stick with Java unless there's a compelling reason to go to Kotlin). I think teams that are doing Android development are more likely to make the switch to Kotlin though, since it has the backing from Google and the Android team. It's expressive and in many ways more enjoyable to code in than Java.



Definitely there is no threat for Kotlin (at least from Java) in the Android territory.  
I guess Java will need to finalize these features and offer some notable extras with LTS release of Java 17.
 
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