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Deployment of Java Project

 
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Hi, I am not much strong in server-side, Currently, I have completed a java project using spring MVC, Hibernate, apache tomcat and
the database is Mysql.

I need to deploy the project. For this I have purchased a Linode server, then I have installed all the needed configurations
like apache tomcat, MySQL. Then I deployed the war file in the installed tomcat.

As a fresher, I don't know the above steps that I followed to deploy my application in a live server is the correct way or not?

If not what is the correct way to deploy a java project?

If there are a lot of requests are coming how can I manage my application?

What all the things I have to make sure while deploying the java project?


 
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Welcome to the Ranch, Jithin!

I find no fault. It's good to have the database installed and prepped first, since the application is going to need it. Then Tomcat, since that's going to be the container for the webapp. Then deploy the webapp into Tomcat, which you can do by copying in a WAR manually, using the Tomcat Management Console webapp or using the Tomcat deployment API. You don't have to do the database before Tomcat, but often one database may be serving more than one application and/or server, so it's usually something you need sooner rather than later. Plus, it's usually more complex to get set up, so good to get out of the way early.
 
Jithin Jose
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Tim Holloway wrote:Welcome to the Ranch, Jithin!

I find no fault. It's good to have the database installed and prepped first, since the application is going to need it. Then Tomcat, since that's going to be the container for the webapp. Then deploy the webapp into Tomcat, which you can do by copying in a WAR manually, using the Tomcat Management Console webapp or using the Tomcat deployment API. You don't have to do the database before Tomcat, but often one database may be serving more than one application and/or server, so it's usually something you need sooner rather than later. Plus, it's usually more complex to get set up, so good to get out of the way early.



Thanks for the reply.

Could you please give comments on this or do you have any reference link about this: If there are a lot of requests are coming how can I manage my application?
 
Tim Holloway
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I'm not sure what you're asking here. But if you're concerned about the load on your web application, it's best to measure and see if there is a load and if so, what parts of the application need to be tuned.

Tomcat can be tuned as well, but its default values are more than sufficient for most uses.
 
Jithin Jose
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Tim Holloway wrote:I'm not sure what you're asking here. But if you're concerned about the load on your web application, it's best to measure and see if there is a load and if so, what parts of the application need to be tuned.

Tomcat can be tuned as well, but its default values are more than sufficient for most uses.




Sorry to make you confuse. I am a very beginner in programming.

By default, tomcat can process 200 threads that mean 200 requests. If there are more than 200 requests coming then how can I manage it? You mentioned 'load' what it means? Is this the same as what I mentioned?  

 
Tim Holloway
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Requests are not the same thing as users. HTTP does not connect and stay connected like time-sharing systems do, so 200 requests could support 2000 users in many cases. The best way to deal with many requests is for the application to handle each request rapidly.
 
Jithin Jose
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Tim Holloway wrote:Requests are not the same thing as users. HTTP does not connect and stay connected like time-sharing systems do, so 200 requests could support 2000 users in many cases. The best way to deal with many requests is for the application to handle each request rapidly.



I really miss understood among the request and users. Thank you Tim for making me understand.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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