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Learn Kubernetes in a Month of Lunches?

 
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Hi ,
A few months back I tried to become familiar with Kubernetes by downloading and running MiniKube on a laptop with 8GB of ram.
Then after that failed, trying on a desktop with 32 GB of RAM where it also fell over.

It  was an immensely frustrating experience . It was incapable of running 3 nodes simultaneously on either of the above computers.
One of the nodes (not the same one ) would not start up  and then regularly I would get a message to recreate the nodes the machines ran on.
The VMs were running simple, single task , example services like running a MySQL query and displaying the results .

That being the case ,is there a way to use your book to learn Kubernetes without having to have an  AWS or similar account to try it out ?
Will the examples run on a laptop ,either Windows or Mac ? That's typically what I would be using during lunch.

Thanks,
Paul
 
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@paul nisset

I'm not sure what you did, but It is impossible to create multi-node cluster with minikube. Minikube simply uses underlying VMware/VirtualBox/KVM/HyperV... to spin up one-node Kubernetes virtual machine (VM requires ~5GB of RAM) and configures the kubectl to use that VM. That's all.

If you want to use something similar (one-node playground), but without too much overhead, you may want to try combination of classic Docker and Kind. It essentially uses Docker images to simulate Kubernetes nodes.

For something more robust, but in the cloud - i would recommend using Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS), which is a fully managed Kubernetes service. The simplest way to create/delete these K8s clusters is with CLI eksctl.

Hit me up if you have more questions.
 
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Hi Paul,

yes as Lucian says there are plenty of simpler options. On Mac or Windows you can use Docker Desktop which runs a single-node cluster for you, and that's fine on a basic laptop with 8GB RAM.

Kind is another option (which you can use with Docker Desktop too) - it needs a bit more management but lets you create multi-node clusters on your laptop.

You can read through chapter 1 of the book which walks through setting up your environment, see section 1.4 https://livebook.manning.com/book/learn-kubernetes-in-a-month-of-lunches/chapter-1/v-5/37.
 
paul nisset
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Thanks Lucien and Elton.

I did this last year so my terminology is probably incorrect. What I meant was  I had three services running on three different local ip addresses (pods).
Each service had a separate YAML file with a separate Docker image.

I'm used to thinking of a node as a separate service running on separate IP address within a system - usually a network.  This is what what was displayed with kubetctl get all.

The point was not to learn Docker .

I'd run "kubectl get all " .
It would show 4 separate pods

http://192.168.99.104:32404/connections/
http://192.168.99.104:30304/users/
http://192.168.99.104:30840/connectionsposts/
http://192.168.99.104:31779/cookbook/

but the STATUS of one or more of the services would be "Not Running" or something like that . One or 2 of the other services would have a status of "Running" . I can't remember what the logs said but from what I recall ,it  had something to do with resources. These were not resource intensive services.

So my question was if I want to learn Kubernetes ,can I reasonably expect it to run the examples from the book on the hardware I previously described?

Thanks,
Paul
 
Elton Stoneman
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Yes, with Docker Desktop or Kind 8GB is OK and 32GB RAM is plenty.

"Nodes" mean something different in Kubernetes, but you'll get to that in time
 
paul nisset
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Yes, with Docker Desktop or Kind 8GB is OK and 32GB RAM is plenty.


Thanks Elton. Good luck with the book.
 
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I have also had no problems with minikube it is limited to just a cluster, if you want something you can take advantage of the different clouds that exist that deliver free credits like gcp or alibaba with 300 dollars you can play a lot.
 
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