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How do you pronounce varargs?

 
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Do you pronounce it as two separate words like "var  args"? Or do you pronounce it as a single word, say, something like "vəˈrɑːrgs"?
 
Marshal
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An interesting question... To tell the truth I have never ever spoken that term, so my answer to that question should be something like "undefined" or "null". However if I were to speak the term I would pronounce it with the first syllable like the first syllable of "variable". I think.
 
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I notice that with a lot of neologisms, I pronounce them using a mix of Dutch and English pronunciation.

I pronounce it like "var args", except I pronounce "args" the Dutch way and I keep the break between the two words very short: ˈvɑːrˌɑːrxs
 
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Don't go to Tennessee, Paul. Whenever we have transatlantic visitors I have a little puzzle, getting them to pronounce English placenames, e.g. Gloucester and Leicester. Usually there is only one they get right, viz Cambridge, the city in East Anglia, not to be confused with the village in Gloucestershire which is pronounced differently. But not for Tennesseans to whom the two pronunciations are indistinguishable.
I have looked on websites galore and never found a pronunciation of varargs I would actually believe. I agree with you: the first syllable comes from “variable” and should therefore be pronounced to rhyme with fair. Also: I would put the accent on the first syllable.
I wouldn't un‑voice the “gs” myself. English doesn't automatically un‑voice the ends of words as German does.
 
Stephan van Hulst
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:I have a little puzzle, getting them to pronounce English placenames, e.g. Gloucester and Leicester.


Going by what I know about a condiment that originated in Worcester, I'd pronounce these place names "Gloster" and "Lester".

Cambridge, the city in East Anglia, not to be confused with the village in Gloucestershire which is pronounced differently.


How are they pronounced differently?

the first syllable comes from “variable” and should therefore be pronounced to rhyme with fair.


I never understood this kind of reasoning. That's like people insisting that an acronym should be pronounced a certain way because the words that make up the acronym are pronounced a certain way. OSHA stands for Occupational Safety and Health Administration but most people would pronounce it ɒ.ʃə or oʊ.ʃə (with a sh as in shush) and not ɒs.hɑː (os ha).
 
Stephan van Hulst
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Then again, English never made sense to me. Why is infinite pronounced in-fih-nit but finite pronounced fie-night?
 
Campbell Ritchie
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But infinite is usually pronounced in‑fie′‑night when you sing.

English pronunciation is notorious for its inconsistencies. As Tim H will tell you, that is partially because of its eclectic etymologies; pronunciations vary with the origins of words. Place names are even worse; the city has its first syllable with a long A rhyming with lame and the village has its first syllable with a short A rhyming with lamb. Your pronunciation of those cities is correct, but I have heard Glough′chester with three syllables the first rhyming with plough. Most transatlantic gusts manage to give those cities three syllables.
 
Frank Mi
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It's very interesting that, though I still don't know how to pronounce "varargs", I learned how to pronounce "Gloucester" here.  
 
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:But infinite is usually pronounced in‑fie′‑night when you sing.



Well, certainly not when I sing.  This one's news to me.  Are you thinking of choral music of some sort?  Got an example?  To me this brings to mind how Shakespeare and others would put an accent in an unusual place, or drop a syllable, to make a rhyme or  meter work out as desired.  "Romeo is banishéd" for example.  (I don't think the accent is usually written out like that, but that's how I remember hearing it.). To me that doesn't mean the accent is supposed to be on that syllable, in general... but that rules can always be bent, for artistic purposes.  But maybe in-fie-nite is more common in the UK?  (I'm in the USA, to be clear.)
 
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Frank Mi wrote:I still don't know how to pronounce "varargs"


I personally just not abbreviating them and calling "variable arguments".
 
Mike Simmons
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I prefer "dot-dot-dot"
 
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hmmm, I've always said "vahr" rhyming with "thar" as in "thar she blows!" and args like the pirate sound.

I'll add one to the mix: enum. Do you say ee noom or ee numb? I use the latter. And, yes, I know it's ee-noom-er-ay-shun but I say ee-numb anyway for the short version.
 
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Junilu Lacar wrote:Do you say ee noom or ee numb? I use the latter. And, yes, I know it's ee-noom-er-ay-shun but I say ee-numb anyway for the short version.


I've only ever heard and used ee-numb.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Ron McLeod wrote:. . . I've only ever heard and used ee-numb.

Round here it would be e′noom with a short oo as in book. And the longer word would be e-nUm-eration with the U a diphthong.
 
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You say var like a pirate saying arrrrrr, and then args, like the beginning of [arg]ument, with an s sound at the end.

varrrrrr-argssssss
 
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Andrew Spiteri wrote:You say var like a pirate saying arrrrrr, and then args, like the beginning of [arg]ument, with an s sound at the end.

varrrrrr-argssssss


You make it sound like a bad pirate joke:

What's a pirate's favourite Java language feature? Varrrrrr aarrrrrrs.
 
Paul Clapham
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:Round here it would be e′noom with a short oo as in book. And the longer word would be e-nUm-eration with the U a diphthong.



I pronounce it (in my mind) as e-noom to rhyme with "doom". Just the first syllable of "enumeration".
 
Frank Mi
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I just recalled another one, how do you pronounce "ArrayDeque"? Most of the time, I heard "Array Deck", but sometimes I also heard "Array Dee Queue". Somebody would argue that "Array Deck" doesn't sound like a queue.
 
Paul Clapham
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Wikipedia has an article about it: Double-ended queue, in which it is claimed that it's pronounced "deck". It has a citation so it must be right, right?

I wouldn't pronounce it that way but clearly I don't get out enough.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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I have only ever heard Deque pronounced deck.
 
Rob Spoor
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From https://docs.oracle.com/en/java/javase/15/docs/api/java.base/java/util/Deque.html:

The name deque is short for "double ended queue" and is usually pronounced "deck".


Probably to avoid confusion with the noun "dequeue" (de-queue).
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Also because que at the ends of words is usually pronounced k rather than cue (except in the Tom and Jerry where the other cat misreads physique as fi′-zik-kew.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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The Java™ Tutorials has the definitive answer about deque. [Addition] The API page says the same.
 
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